Course of Study Guide

  • CURRICULUM AND POLICIES

    Graduation Requirements
    Student Assessments
    Grading System
    Honor Roll
    Class Rank
    Special Education
    Credits for Grade Level Promotion
    AP/IB/Dual Credit Courses
    College Entrance Requirements
    NCAA Requirements

     


    PROGRAM OF STUDIES

    Academy Program Descriptions Academic Sequences


    COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    Business and Finance
    English
    English Language Learners
    Family and Consumer Sciences
    Mathematics
    Physical Education
    Science
    Social Studies
    Technology/IT/Engineering
    Visual and Performing Arts
    World Languages
    Academic Enrichment Programs
    Senior Year Options
    Elective Choices by Grade Level

  • RED BANK REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

    To earn a Red Bank Regional High School diploma students must earn 140 credits and complete the graduation requirements established by the State of New Jersey and the Board of Education which include the areas listed on the chart below:


    LANGUAGE ARTS LITERACY

    20 credits assigned to grade 9 through grade 12 standards

    MATHEMATICS

    15 credits including algebra I and geometry or the content equivalent* and a third year of math that builds on the concepts and skills of algebra and geometry and prepares students for college and 21st century careers

    SCIENCE

    15 credits including at least five credits in laboratory biology/life science or the content equivalent*; an additional laboratory/
    inquiry-based science course including chemistry, environmental science, or physics; and a third laboratory/inquiry-based science course

    SOCIAL STUDIES

    15 credits including satisfaction of N.J.S.A. 18A:35-1 and 2; five credits in world history; and the integration of civics, economics, geography and global content in all course offerings

    FINANCIAL, ECONOMIC BUSINESS, AND ENTREPRENEURIAL LITERACY

    2.5 credits

    HEALTH, SAFETY, AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    3 ¾ credits in health, safety, and physical education during each year of enrollment, distributed as 150 minutes per week, as required by N.J.S.A. 18A:35-5, 7 and 8

    VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

    5 credits

    WORLD LANGUAGES

    5 credits or student demonstration of proficiency

    TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY

    Consistent with the Core Curriculum Content Standards, integrated throughout the curriculum

    21ST CENTURY LIFE AND CAREERS, OR CAREER-TECHNICAL EDUCATION

    5 credits

    NJDOE Testing

    As indicated in the chart under “Student Assessments”


    *“Content equivalent” means courses or activities that include the same or equivalent knowledge and skills as those found in traditionally titled courses which are required for high school graduation and which are aligned with the Core Curriculum Content Standards. This content must be taught by certified teachers, may be integrated in one or more courses, may be titled differently, or may present material in an interdisciplinary or spiral format.

     

    STUDENT ASSESSMENTS FOR GRADUATION

    All New Jersey public school students must take statewide standardized testing as part of their high school requirement. In 2014-2015, NJ, working with the Partnership for Assessment and Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), began assessing students’ ability in Language Arts Literacy and Mathematics. All 9th, 10th and 11th grade students will be tested. All students enrolled in a Biology course must take and show proficiency on the New Jersey Biology Competency Test. This test will be administered to students during the year the course is taken. The chart below provides important information regarding test scores and graduation requirements for the class of 2018, 2019 and 2020:


    English Language Arts

    Mathematics

    PARCC ELA Grade 9 >= 750 (Level 4) or

    PARCC Algebra I >= 750 (Level 4) or

    PARCC ELA Grade 10 >=750 (Level 4) or

    PARCC Geometry >= 725 (Level 3) or

    PARCC ELA Grade 11 >= 725 (Level 3) or

    PARCC Algebra II >= 725 (Level 3) or

    Prior  to  3/1/16  SAT  Critical  Reading  >= 400 or

    Prior to 3/1/16 SAT Math >= 400 or

    3/1/16    or    later    SAT    Evidence-Based
    Reading and Writing Section >= 450  or SAT Reading Test >= 22

    3/1/16 or later SAT Math Section >= 440
    or SAT Math Test >= 22

    ACT Reading or ACT PLAN Reading >= 16  or

    ACT or ACT PLAN Math>= 16 or

    Accuplacer Write Placer >= 6 or

    Accuplacer Elementary Algebra >= 76 or

    Accuplacer Write Placer ESL >= 4 or

    Prior to October 2015 PSAT10 Reading or PSAT/NMSQT Reading  >=40 or  
    After October 2015 PSAT10  Reading or PSAT/NMSQT Reading >=22 or

    Prior to October 2015 PSAT10 Math or PSAT/NMSQT Math*>= 40 or
    After October 2015 PSAT10   Math   or   PSAT/NMSQT  Math** >= 22 or

    ACT Aspire Reading >= 422 or

    ACT Aspire Math >= 422 or

    ASVAB-AFQT Composite >=31 or

    ASVAB-AFQT Composite >=31 or

    Meet  the  Criteria  of  the  NJDOE  Portfolio Appeal

    Meet  the  Criteria  of  the  NJDOE  Portfolio Appeal


    As per the latest NJDOE guidelines, starting with the Class of 2021, students will be required to achieve proficiency on the PARCC ELA Grade 10 and Algebra I exams to earn a High School Diploma. If students do not achieve proficiency on these two assessments, students will only be able to submit a NJDOE Portfolio Appeal if they have taken al ELA Grade 9 – 11 and PARCC Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II exams.


    SPECIAL EDUCATION GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

    Special Education students must meet all state and local high school graduation requirements in order to receive a state endorsed high school diploma unless exempted in their Individualized Education Program (IEP). A description of a rationale for exemptions from the regular educational program must be included in their IEP. These students must participate in statewide assessments.



    GRADING SYSTEM

    Students will be graded on a numerical scale. Report cards will be mailed to parents four times each school year. Below is the interpretation for each grade range:


    Grade Interpretation
    100-90   Excellent
    89-80 Above Average
    79-70 Average
    69-65 Below Average
    64-0 Failing Grade


    Grade Interpretation
    55 or above RBR Summer School Review Course
    PAS Pass
    WP or WF   Withdrew (Pass/Fail)
    NC No Credit


    HONOR ROLL

    To be eligible for the various Honor Rolls a student must obtain:
    High Honor Roll (Maxima Cum Honore) - All 90s or above.
    Honor Roll (Magna Cum Honore) - At least 90 in two subjects and no grade less than 80.
    Credit List (Cum Honore) - At least 80 in all subjects.


    CLASS RANK

    Class rank is calculated at the conclusion of the junior year. It is recalculated after the 7th semester and a final rank is determined after the 3rd marking period. All 2.5, 5, 6, 10 and 15 credit courses are ranked with the exception of courses graded on a pass/fail basis, courses taken online, or as part of an ILO.


    Student’s grade point average is calculated by multiplying the credit value by the final grade. A product for each course is obtained and all of the products are then totaled and divided by the total number of credits attempted to determine the student's grade point average. Pass/Fail, Online, and ILO courses will not be calculated in a student’s grade point average.

    Reporting of class rank is optional for all students.


    CREDITS FOR GRADE LEVEL PROMOTION

    Any student who does not achieve the following credits will be retained in their current grade level and be deemed ineligible for privileges afforded the promotional grade level.

    • 30 credits to be considered a sophomore
    • 65 credits to be considered a junior
    • 100 to be considered a senior

    ADVANCED LEVEL COURSES

    The district offers a variety of International Baccalaureate (IB), Advanced Placement (AP), Dual Credit and Honors courses for rigorous studies. Placement into these courses is determined by criteria explained in more detail under the course descriptions.


    International Baccalaureate

    Advanced Placement

    Dual Credit Courses

    IB Biology SL

    AP Art History

    SUPA Forensic Science

    IB English HL

    AP Art Studio

    SUPA Cybersecurity

    IB Enviro Sys & Societies SL

    AP Biology

    FDU Sports Administration

    IB French HL

    AP Calculus AB

    FDU Anatomy & Physiology

    IB French SL

    AP Calculus BC

    FDU Drama 4

    IB Italian SL

    AP Chemistry

    FDU Creative Writing 4

    IB History of Americas HL

    AP Computer Science A

    FDU Adv. Graphic Novels

    IB Mathematical Studies SL

    AP Computer Science Prin.

    FDU Tomorrow' Teachers

    IB Mathematics SL

    AP Microeconomics

    GCU Nutrition & Wellness

    IB Physics HL

    AP English 3 Lang & Comp               

    GCU Found. of Exercise Science

    IB Psychology SL

    AP English 4 Lit and Comp

    IB Psychology HL

    AP European History

    IB Spanish HL

    AP French

    IB Theory of Knowledge

    AP Human Geography

    IB Visual Arts HL

    AP Music Theory

    AP Physics 1/2

    AP Physics C

    AP Spanish

    AP Statistics

    AP US History



    All International Baccalaureate (IB), Advanced Placement (AP), Dual Credit and Honors courses are weighted for the purpose of calculating class rank. IB HL, AP, and Syracuse courses will receive 10 additional points and FDU, GCU and IB SL courses will receive 5 additional points.  All students enrolled in AP and IB courses are required to take the examinations for the course to earn the weighted credit. Fees are required for enrollment in IB and Dual Credit courses, and to take AP exams. Weighting and credits are awarded upon course completion.


    COLLEGE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

    District graduation requirements may not fulfill all college entrance requirements. It is imperative that each student review the specific entrance requirements for the colleges on their personal application list. Students planning to attend college after graduation should work closely with their school counselor in selecting courses each year.


    Most colleges review the following criteria to determine admission to their school:
    1. The high school transcript
    2. SAT or ACT Scores
    3. Personal statement or essay
    4. Extracurricular participation and/or special talents
    5. Teacher and counselor recommendations


    It is recommended that all college-bound students select the following courses as a minimum for college admission:
    4 years of college prep English
    4 years of Mathematics (including Algebra 1 & 2 and Geometry)
    4 years of Social Studies
    4 years of Science (including Biology and Chemistry)
    3 years of World Languages


    NCAA ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS


    Division I:
    1. Graduate from high school;
    2. Complete a minimum of 16 core courses;
    3. Present the required grade-point average (GPA) and SAT or ACT (sliding scale)
    4. Complete the amateurism questionnaire and request final amateurism certification.


    Division II
    1. Graduate from high school;
    2. Complete a minimum of 16 core courses
    3. Present the required grade-point average (GPA) and SAT or ACT (sliding scale)
    4. Complete the amateurism questionnaire and request final amateurism certification.


    Eligibility is determined by an initial eligibility index - see the NCAA website https://web1.ncaa.org/eligibilitycenter/common/  for more details.  All student athletes are encouraged to register with the NCAA during their junior year in order for the Clearinghouse to review their transcript for initial eligibility.

  • FRESHMAN ACADEMY PROGRAM


    MISSION
    The mission of the Freshman Academy is to transition our incoming freshmen and provide them with academic and social skills to successfully navigate the RBR curriculum.

    ACADEMY FEATURES

    • Incoming freshmen are assigned to a House of approximately one hundred students
    • Each House consists of cross-curricular teams of English, Math, Science, and Social Studies teachers with one member serving as a team coordinator (Lead teacher)
    • Each House has a common planning period for staff and school counselor to meet
    • Engaging and challenging curriculum with an integrated, interdisciplinary approach that uses academic content and skills to address real world projects and problems
    • Students may participate in required and elective classes outside their house, as well as other activities such as clubs and sports
    • Careful monitoring of student performance and attendance
    • Frequent contact between school and parents
    • Literacy infusion into all content areas
    • Ongoing recognition of accomplishments

    BENEFITS TO STUDENTS:

    • Academically rigorous education that maintains high expectations for each student
    • Increased academic achievement, student attendance, supporting positive attitudes
    • Develop student awareness of academic/career options
    • Stronger student-teacher relationships
    • Integration of academic and technical skills
    • Increased extracurricular participation rate

    ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS PROGRAM

    Red Bank Regional offers a high intensity ELL program designed to improve the skills of English Language Learners.  High quality instruction extends throughout the curriculum, and most core content area courses are taught with the assistance of a bilingual paraprofessional.  Students are mainstreamed in these courses. The department features a cross-content teaching team, and assessments are done using a portfolio approach. Curriculum is both culturally relevant and reflective of the contemporary multicultural adolescent experience.  Tutoring is available in English and Spanish for all ELL students during lunch hours and after school.  Parent involvement and student advocacy are also integral to the program.  Seniors are eligible for the Puente al Futuro program (Bridge to the Future) a Fast Start college program at Brookdale Community College.  This program offers ELL seniors the opportunity to take six college credits in their senior year of high school.   Students successful in the program may then apply for a full scholarship upon graduation from Red Bank Regional and continue their college education at Brookdale Community College. Students are placed in ELL classes according to their scores on standardized tests, classroom performance, and portfolio assessment.


    Academic Sequences for Core Content Areas

    Content Area

    Ninth Grade

    Tenth Grade

    Eleventh Grade

    Twelfth Grade

     

    English Language Arts

     

    English 9

     

    English 10

     

    English 11

     

    English 12

     

    Social Studies

     

    Global Studies CP

     

    US History 1

     

    U.S. History II

     

    History or Social Sciences Elective

     

     

    Mathematics

    Algebra I  

     

    Geometry

     

    Algebra II

    Geometry

     

    Algebra II  

     

    Pre-Calculus

    Algebra II

     

    Pre-Calculus

     

    Calculus or other math elective

    Pre-Calculus or Statistics

    Calculus or other math elective

    Math elective 

     

     

    Science

     

    Exploratory Science

     

    Biology

     

    Biology

     

    Chemistry

     

    Chemistry

     

    Physics or
    other science elective

     

    Physicsor
    other science elective

    Science Elective

     

    World Languages

     

    World Language 1

    World Language 2

     

    World Language 2

    World Language 3

     

    World Language 3

    World Language 4

     

    World Language 4

    AP/IB Language


    INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM

    The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme is a rigorous and comprehensive pre-university course of studies designed to expose motivated high school students to a challenging, innovative, and well-balanced academic program. The IB program encourages academic and personal achievement and promotes international mindedness and intercultural understanding and respect. IB courses are open to all juniors and seniors and are meant to appeal to students who strive to be inquirers, knowledgeable, thinkers, communicators, principled, open-minded, caring, risk-takers, balanced, and reflective.

    IB Diploma students take IB courses in 6 subject areas: English, World Language, Social Studies (History, Psychology), Science, Math, and the Arts. IB Diploma students can choose to forgo the Arts class and take a second World Language, Social Studies, or Science course instead.  Students take three or four courses at the Higher Level (HL) and two or three courses at the Standard Level (SL) for a total of 6 courses. All IB Diploma students must complete three compulsory components as well over 2 years: an interdisciplinary Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course, a Creativity-Activity-Service (CAS) piece, and a 4,000 word independent Extended Essay (EE) on a topic of their choice. Students who do not take all 6 IB courses and who do not participate in the 3 core components needed for the IB Diploma can earn an IB Certificate instead.

    The benefits of being an IB Diploma student are numerous. Such benefits include improved time-management skills, increased experience with oral presentations, and opportunities to apply college-level research and writing skills. IB Diploma students also gain an edge for college admission and can potentially earn college credit for individual courses and/or for earning an IB Diploma. For more information please contact the IB Coordinator, Ryan Hilligus, at rhilligus@rbrhs.org.


    Academic Sequences for IB Program

    Pre IB
    Grade 9

    Pre IB
    Grade 10

    IB Year 1
    Grade 11

    IB Year 2
    Grade 12

    Group 1--
    Language

    English 1

    Honors English 2
    English 2 CP

    IB English HL 1

    IB English HL 2

    Group 2--
    Second Language

    Spanish/French/Italian 1

    Spanish/French/Italian 1

     

    Spanish/French/Italian 2 & 2 Honors

    Spanish/French/Italian 2

    Accelerated Spanish/French/Italian 2/3

    Spanish/French/Italian 3 & 3 Honors

    Spanish/French/Italian 3

     

    IB Spanish/French/Italian HL 1

    IB Spanish/French/Italian SL

     

    IB Spanish/French/Italian HL 2

    Group 3—
    Individuals and Societies

    Global Studies

    Honors US History 1
    US History 1 CP

    IB History of the Americas HL 1

    IB Psychology HL 1

    IB Psychology SL (1 year)

    IB History of the Americas HL 2

    IB Psychology HL 2

    IB Psychology SL (1 year)

    Group 4—Experimental Sciences

    Biology

    Exploratory Science

    Honors Chemistry

    Chemistry CP

    Biology

    IB Environmental Systems and Society SL (1 year), IB Physics SL (1 year) or IB Biology SL (1 year)

    IB Physics HL 1

    IB Environmental Systems and Society SL (1 year), IB Physics SL (1 year) or IB Biology SL (1 year)

     

    IB Physics HL 2

     

    Group 5—Mathematics

     

    Algebra 1

    Algebra 1

    Geometry

    Algebra 2

     

    Geometry

    Algebra 2

    Honors Algebra 2

    Pre-Calculus

    Honors Pre-Calculus

     

    Algebra 2

    Honors Algebra 2

    Pre-Calculus

    Honors Pre-Calculus

    IB Math SL (1 year)

     

    IB Math Studies SL (1 year)

    IB Math SL (1 year)

    AP Calculus BC

    AP Statistics

    Group 6—The Arts

     

     

     

    IB Visual Arts HL 1

     

    IB Visual Arts HL 2

    Core IB course for Diploma Students

    IB Theory of  Knowledge (2nd Semester)

    IB Theory of  Knowledge
    (1st Semester)


    ACADEMY OF ENGINEERING PROGRAM

    The Academy of Engineering (AOE) was developed with leaders from industry and education and is aligned with Project Lead the Way, a national high school engineering curriculum.  The program provides an excellent education where every student explores real world applications that are challenging and grounded in engineering principles. The academy promotes effective learning through the use of technology, effective teaching, creativity, and competitions that prepare our students for the next stages of their life while developing a passion for learning.  Students enrolled in this academy can participate in the Technology Student Association (TSA), which offers students the opportunity to compete in engineering and technology related activities. RBR students have placed 1st in State Competitions, nine out of the past ten years, and qualified and competed nationally seven out of ten years. Students may receive college credit through above average performance in the course and on the final exam. The college credit may be articulated through a variety of approved four year colleges.


    Academic Sequence for Academy of Engineering

    9

    10

    11

    12

     

    Intro to Engineering Design

     

    Digital Electronics

     

    Honors Principles of Engineering

     

    Honors Engineering Design and Development

     

    AP Computer Science Principles

    Honors Computer Integrated Manufacturing
    or
    Honors Civil Engineering and Architecture
    or
    Honors Aerospace Engineering
    or
    Honors Environmental Sustainability

    Honors Computer Integrated Manufacturing
    or
    Honors Civil Engineering and Architecture
    or
    Honors Aerospace Engineering
    or
    Honors Environmental Sustainability

    Honors Computer Integrated Manufacturing
    or
    Honors Civil Engineering and Architecture
    or
    Honors Aerospace Engineering
    or
    Honors Environmental Sustainability


    ACADEMY OF VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS PROGRAM

    Red Bank Regional’s NJ state certified Career Technical Education Visual and Performing Arts Academy offers fourteen four-year majors in: Studio Art, Photography, Creative Writing, Dance, Drama, Interactive Media, Instrumental Music: Brass, Percussion, Woodwinds, Strings, Guitar, Harp, Piano, and Vocal Music. Through rigorous daily practice along with numerous performance and exhibition opportunities, students develop as individual artists in preparation for further study at the college level and as professionals. In 2010, the VPA Academy was named a NJ Model School for the Arts by the NJ Arts Education Partnership and has been commended as the #1 Arts program in Monmouth and Ocean County by the Asbury Park Press.


    Academic Sequence for VPA: Brass, Percussion, Woodwind and Vocal

    9

    10

    11

    12

    Instrument Lvl 1/
    Vocal Lvl 1

     

    Instrument Lvl 2/
    Vocal Lvl 2

     

    Instrument Lvl 3/
    Vocal Lvl 3

     

    Instrument Lvl 4/
    Vocal Lvl 3

     

    VPA Music Theory

     

    VPA Musicianship

     

    AP Music Theory

     

    VPA Advanced Music Technology

    Band/Orchestra/
    Concert Choir

    Band/Orchestra/
    Concert Choir

    Band/Orchestra/
    Concert Choir

    Band/Orchestra/
    Concert Choir


    Note: In order to complete all requirements for this VPA programs, students must take Mod PE in lieu of study hall

    Academic Sequence for VPA: Piano, Harp, Guitar

    9

    10

    11

    12

     

    Instrument Level 1

     

    Instrument Level 2

     

    Instrument Level 3

     

    Instrument Level 4

     

    VPA Music Theory

     

    VPA Musicianship

     

    AP Music Theory

     

    Adv MusicTechnology


    Academic Sequence for VPA: Drama, Creative Writing, Dance, Commercial Photography, Studio Art


    9

    10

    11

    12

     

    Level 1

     

    Level 2

     

    Level 3

     

    Level 4

     

    Level 1

     

    Level 2

     

    Level 3

     

    Level 4


    Academic Sequence for VPA: Interactive Media

    9

    10

    11

    12

     

    Intro to Interactive Media

     

    Interactive Media 1

     

    Interactive Media 2

     

    Interactive Media 3

     

    Digital Literacy/PFL

     

    Interactive Media 1

     

    Interactive Media 2

     

    Interactive Media 3


    ACADEMY OF FINANCE PROGRAM

    Red Bank Regional’s NJ state certified Career and Technical Education Academy of Finance partners with the National Academy Foundation to provide career-oriented class work in corporate and financial industry areas. NAF designs industry-related curricula to enrich the experiences and opportunities available to our students. Through a wide variety of classes and electives, students can explore the fields of Economics, Accounting, Management and Financial Planning to better prepare them for college-level study in these areas. Students complete an internship between Junior and Senior year for real-world work experience prior to college. For more information visit: www.naf.org


    Academic Sequence for Academy of Finance

    9

    10

    11

    12

     

    AOF Principles of Financial Success

     

    Accounting 1

     

    Business Economics

     

    AOF Financial Planning, Investment and Insurance

     

    Ethics in Business/Digital Literacy

     

    Marketing/
    Entrepreneurship

     

    Honors Accounting 2 or AP Economics

    Honors Accounting 2 or
    Business Management and Managerial Operations OR AP Economics


    ACADEMY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    The Academy of Information Technology (AOIT) focuses on providing a  top-notch education that integrates higher level computing skills with real-world applications.  The academy ensures that students develop the knowledge and expertise needed to become computing professionals. This program fosters an environment that excites students about the opportunities available across all aspects of the technology industry. Students follow two concentrations within AOIT: Computer Science and Networking/Cybersecurity. All courses within the program are college preparatory with many students continuing on to a post-secondary education. Students within the academy will take 2 AP Computer Science courses as well a SUPA (Syracuse University Project Advance) course for college credit.  Students enrolled in this academy have competed and placed in many Information Technology competitions. These honors include placing within the top 5 in NJ for FBLA computing competitions and being named national finalists in the CyberPatriot competitions.

     

    Academic Sequence for Information Technology: Computer Science

    9

    10

    11

    12

     

    AP Computer Science Principles

     

    Honors Computer Science 2

     

    AP Computer Science A

     

    Web and Mobile Application Development

     

    Introduction to Computer Systems

     

    Honors Networking

    Honors CyberSecurity
    or
    AOIT/AOE elective

     

    Honors Digital Forensics
    or
    AOIT/AOE elective


    Academic Sequence for Information Technology: Networking

    9

    10

    11

    12

     

    Introduction to Computer Systems

     

    Honors Networking

     

    Honors CyberSecurity

     

    Honors Digital Forensics

     

    AP Computer Science Principles

     

    Honors Computer Science 2

     

    AP Computer Science A
    or
    AOIT/AOE elective

    Web and Mobile Application Development
    or
    AOIT/AOE elective


    ACADEMY OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAM

    Red Bank Regional’s NJ state certified Career and technical Education Academy of Early Childhood Education is designed to prepare students to enter careers in Education, Students receive training in child development and lesson planning, allowing them to become the teachers at Red Bank Regional’s active pre-school. By Senior year, students are enrolled in Tomorrow’s Teachers, pairing students with professional educators at partner schools.


    Academic Sequence for Early Childhood Development

    9

    10

    11

    12

     

    Child and Personal Development

     

    Preschool Lab

     

    Psychology/Sociology

     

    Tomorrow’s Teachers or Preschool Lab

     

    Strategies for Success/Personal Financial Literacy

     

    Preschool Lab

     

    Fine and Performing Arts Elective

    Social Sciences Elective or Preschool Lab

  • RED BANK REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
    2017-2018 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


    When students indicate their courses of interest during the Spring, every effort is made to put the best schedule together for each student.  Due to scheduling conflicts and the academic rigor of the individual student’s requests, there is no guarantee that all selected courses will fit in a student’s schedule.  When completing course selections, students’ should list as many alternates as possible in case first choices are not possible.  Failure to return a course selection form to the counseling office signed by both a student and parent/guardian can have a negative impact on placement.  Student elective selections must be finalized prior to June 9, 2017. No changes to students’ selected electives will be made in the fall.


    The deadline for student and parent initiated academic level changes is the end of the second week of school, based on the availability of the courses and changes based on the academic best interest of the student. The deadline for teacher recommendations on academic level changes is the end of the first marking period, based on the availability of the preferred course and identified utilization of available academic supports. All grades from the initial course will follow the student to the new course.


    Only course level changes will be made; no elective changes will occur. Withdrawal from any course after the deadline will result in a withdraw pass (WP) or withdraw fail (WF) on the student’s transcript.  Any changes after these dates must have administrative approval.


    The following pages contain brief descriptions of each course offered at Red Bank Regional High School. Please note the following abbreviations:


    CR = number of high school credits given for passing the course
    YO = the grade level or year in which the course is offered to students
    PRE = prerequisite course required with a passing final grade


    All 2.5 credit courses are semester-long courses. All other courses are full-year courses with the exception of Health (one marking period) and Physical Education (three marking periods).

  • BUSINESS AND FINANCE COURSES


    Accounting 1 (6610) – This is a required course for Academy of Finance sophomores; however, college bound students who plan any business major will find this course to be extremely valuable as a basis for required courses in college.  Students engage in a comprehensive study of accounting utilizing the double-entry system for recording, analyzing, and interpreting business operations from a financial standpoint.  Students gain a background in business operations and procedures with related business terminology.  Both a sole proprietorship service business and a corporation merchandising business are examined.  An accounting simulation is the focus of the last marking period reinforcing Generally Accepted Accounting Practices.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12.  (Required for all AOF Grade 10 students; elective for Grades 10, 11, 12 students)


    AOF Principles of Financial Success (6604) This full year course is designed to give students an overview of the world of finance.  Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of financial concepts such as: financial intermediaries, wealth, personal budgeting, banking, credit and debt management, investment banking, different forms of business ownership, and ethics in business.  While learning about these important financial concepts, students will comprehend the importance of preparation, study habits, proper interpersonal communication skills, and developing a career plan; which can be used for the remainder of their professional lives. CR 5; YO 9; Required for all Grade 9 AOF students


    AP Economics (6637) – This course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system and the economic systems as a whole. Macro and Micro Economic principles will be discussed.  CR 5, YO 11,12


    Applied Finance (6623) –Applied Finance delves into the financial concepts introduced in Introduction to Finance. Students learn to identify the legal forms of business organization and continue to develop an understanding of profit. They learn about various financial analysis strategies and the methods by which businesses raise capital. Students also have the chance to explore, in depth, topics of high interest in the field of finance, and explore the types of careers that exist in finance today.  CR 2.5, Y0 11,With Business in the Global Economy, one of two options for grade 11 AOF students


    Business Economics (6620)Business Economics introduces students to the key concepts of microeconomics and macroeconomics.  This course discusses the American economy and the allocation of the factors that influence the business firm and its products.  Additionally, this course analyzes the role of consumers, their behavior and choices, as well as, the role of producers and the role of production and cost within the market setting, through the theory of supply and demand and the circular flow of the economy.  Students are introduced to forms of competition and the relationship of labor and business, as well as, a broad overview of the global economy. Students will understand the indicators used to measure the success of an economy, such as CPI, GDP, unemployment and supply and demand. In addition, they will be introduces to the role of government and fiscal policy to analyze its potential impact on the economy.  CR 5, YO 11, 12 Required grade 11 for AOF students or elective for all students 11 & 12 grades

    Business in the Global Economy (6622) –This course provides students with an understanding of how and why businesses choose to expand their operations into other countries.  This course exposes students to the unique challenges facing firms doing business internationally.  Building on concepts introduced in Principles of Finance, this course broadens students’ understanding of how businesses operate, grow, and thrive in our ever-changing world.  CR 2.5, YO 11,12  With Applied Finance, one of two options for grade 11 AOF students.  PRE Principles of Financial Success


    Business Management and Managerial Operations (6634)This course provides students with practical experience to apply their business skills. The International Business Practice Firm (IBPF) is a company set up by students with the assistance of a teacher/facilitator. In an authentic office setting, linked by technology, the student/employee engages in simulated business transactions with other firms, both here and abroad. The program allows students to experience all facets of being an employee in a firm, including human resources, accounting, product development, production, distribution, marketing, and sales. In addition, the simulation enables students to understand how employees, workgroup teams and departments interact and work together for the common goal of the company.  Students will improve their ability to handle information, make decisions, set goals and objectives, and to evaluate those goals.  Students will learn about the use of technology in a business, including the use of the Internet for global transactions and communications. CR 5, YO 12 PRE AOF Senior or a previous business course and/or approved by instructor (invitation only)


    Business Software Solutions (6601) This semester class, using various application-based exercises, introduces students to various computer programs that are necessary for students and professionals to master.  Over the course of the year, students will comprehend the importance and uses for Microsoft Office Suite. Using Word, students will create MLA style reports, create cover letters and resumes`, and draw tables.  In Excel, students will design spreadsheets to be used in various occupations in the future.  Publisher will enable students to create brochures, letterheads, flyers, and other documents related to various industries.  PowerPoint encourages students to create and present projects that can be used both in the classroom and in the real world, individually or in a group.  CR 2.5; YO 9, 10,


    Digital Literacy (IC3)* (6665) – Using project-based instruction and hands-on labs, this course will give students the technology competencies to be successful at college or work.  The course provides an overview of information technology and develops mastery in two IC3 modules: Key applications and Living Online.  The Key Applications module concentrates on acquiring expertise in file management, word processing, spreadsheet functions and presentation applications.  The Living Online module addresses methods for effectively and safely accessing online information.  Students will develop advanced skills in Internet research and will also consider contemporary issues such as netiquette, privacy, and ethical use of digital content CR 2.5, YO 9,10,11,12 – Required grade 9 for AOF students along with Ethics in Business


    Entrepreneurship (6624) – This course is designed to give the student a basic guide to the process of starting and managing his or her own business.  The course focuses on the steps necessary to start a business, including the legal forms of business ownership, pricing merchandise, market research and advertising, hiring employees, and a variety of start-up activities.  Students concentrate on the steps necessary to prepare a business plan.  CR 2.5, YO 10, 11, 12   Required grade 10 for AOF students along with Marketing


    Ethics in Business (6625) This course introduces the importance of ethics in business. Students focus on the significance of ethics to stakeholders; examine who bears responsibility for monitoring ethics; and explore ethical situations common in organizations. Students examine how ethics affects various business disciplines and consider the impact of organizational culture. Students also explore ethics as social responsibility, the evolution of ethics in international business, and how the free market and ethics can coexist. CR 2.5, YO 9, 10,11,12  Required grade 9 for AOF students along with Digital Literacy


    Financial Planning, Investment and Insurance (6630)Financial Planning provides students with an overview of the job of a financial planner. Students learn to consider how all aspects of financial planning might affect a potential client, and learn about the importance of financial planning in helping people reach their life goals. This course includes lessons on saving, borrowing, credit, and all types of insurance, and covers various types of investments. Students also examine careers in financial planning. CR 5, YO 11,12 Required grade 12 for AOF students


    Honors Accounting 2 (6611) – Reviews the basic theory introduced in Accounting 1 and moves on to payroll, special journals, adjustments, depreciation, inventory, notes payable and receivable, uncollectible accounts, interest, accruals and advanced financial statements.  Corporate accounting is emphasized through the inclusion of a project researching the history and backgrounds of major corporations and analyzing their Annual Reports.  CR 5, YO 11,12,  PRE Accounting 1 (an average of 85 or higher is recommended)


    Marketing (6631) – This course is an introduction to marketing where the students are responsible for the establishment of the marketing mix for their fictitious product.  The students will conduct research and analyze data, as it relates to planning, analysis, implementation, and control functions of their marketing mix and marketing plan, in order to achieve their desired marketing goals. The course introduces the students to market segmentation and targeting of a potential market through demographic and psychographic analysis to create a consumer profile.  The students will demonstrate how the profile is used to assist in the creation of the varied components of the marketing function, such as product packaging, pricing, or distribution. The course concludes with the students creating a promotional plan to reach their target audience for a specific product. CR 2.5, YO 10, 11, 12  Required grade 10 AOF students along with Entrepreneurship


    Personal Financial Literacy (6603) – This semester course is designed to assist students in understanding the basics of personal finance. Through application based lessons, students develop financial literacy as they learn about the function of finance in society.  Topics that are discussed during this class include: finance intermediaries, wealth, personal budgeting, banking, credit and debit management, investment banking, different forms of business ownership and ethics in business. CR   2.5; YO 9, 10. 11 This class fulfills the 9.2 Financial Literacy requirements.


    Strategies for Success (6602) – This semester course helps to orient students to the world of work and school.  It addresses the needs of the students to develop good work and study habits, helps students to prepare portfolios, learn about school resources, develop career plans, start preparing for college and develop solid interpersonal skills.  CR 2.5, YO 9,10

  • ENGLISH COURSES


    English 1 CP (1101) – This course uses a problem-based learning approach to stress those literary skills essential to success: reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing. Study skills, vocabulary skills and critical thinking are infused into the curriculum to help students make the transition from elementary to secondary school.  Literary selections are organized by genre. Students keep a writing folder, which is a record of their major composition work.  Embedded in the program is an “honors option” which may reward students for meeting established criteria.  Students who complete work at this level may be eligible for honors credit and a five point honors weight on their final averages. CR 5, YO 9


    Honors English 2 (1108) – This is a course for students whose achievement is highest at the grade level.  Literature is organized by genre and includes works which reflect major figures in America's diverse cultural and literary heritage.  This literature strengthens students' critical reading and writing skills.  In addition, students work on a number of independent projects.  CR 5, YO 10, PRE English 1 CP,


    English 2 CP (1104) – This course uses a problem-based learning approach to explore the history and development of American literature through a variety of genres: the novel, drama, nonfiction, short story and poetry.  The course spans early American to 21st Century literature.  Composition process and revision, SAT/PARCC preparation and contextual vocabulary skills and methods of debate are also incorporated.  CR 5, YO 10, PRE English 1


    AP English 1 Language and Composition (1114) – This is a course for students whose achievement is highest at the grade level.  This course focuses primarily on critical analysis of rhetorical strategies found in nonfiction European and American literature.  Some fiction from the English 3 CP curriculum is also included in coursework.  The course is designed to help students become skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and to become skilled writers who can compose for a variety of purposes.  Emphasis is placed on the emerging character and distinctive qualities of European and American thought through sermons, journals, essays, short stories, drama and the novel.  Research papers are required.  This course prepares students to take the AP Language and Composition exam and provides the foundation for AP English 2 Literature and Composition.  Students who receive a 3 or better on the AP exam may be eligible for college credits.  CR 5, YO 11,12 Suggested PRE Honors English 2 or 90 or better in English 2 CP, or a teacher recommendation.


    IB English HL (1121) – The first year of the two-year curriculum focuses on close reading of three works, examining how authors create meaning through literary techniques. Students begin the year analyzing summer texts and additional 20th and 21st century readings; study culminates in an Individual Oral Presentation of 10-15 minutes based on one of these works.  Students then explore four works in translation, exploring the global context of each work through research, discussion and writing.  By the end of the year, students will have created a four-stage written analysis of one of the translated works.  CR 5, YO 11, PRE English 2


    English 3 CP (1109) – This course focuses on a survey of the rich heritage of English literature emphasizing the chronological development of the English language as revealed in celebrated literary works from Europe and around the globe. Students study drama, short stories, poetry and novels.  Course requirements include a research paper.  PARCC and SAT preparation includes intensive vocabulary study and practice exams. CR 5, YO 11, PRE English 2


    AP English 2 Literature and Composition (1120) – With an intense focus on reading, writing, and literary analysis, Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition develops students’ critical thinking skills and encourages their academic independence.  Conceived as a college-level introduction to literature course, AP English covers a complete range of literature and demands much of each student.  This course requires close reading of texts, and students will practice analytical and critical writing to heighten their critical and rhetorical abilities.  Students will complete numerous timed writings and review previously administered exams in preparation for the AP Lit and Comp exam in May.  Students who receive a 3 or better on the AP exam may be eligible for college credit.  Two research papers are required in this class.  It is recommended that students who enter AP English Lit from AP English Language receive a score of 3 or better on the AP Language and Composition exam.  CR 5, YO 12, Suggested PRE AP English 1 (85 average or higher)


    IB English HL 2 (1122) – The second year of the IB English curriculum involves two parts.  First, the class conducts detailed study of several works of various genres. Students are assessed through an extensive oral evaluation which includes a formal oral commentary of poetry and a student-teacher discussion of a work of another genre. The second half of the year is spent reading and analyzing texts of a specific literary genre; students complete two year-end external written exams based on at least two works studied. CR 5, YO 12, PRE IB English HL1


    Honors English 4 Humanities (1119) – This course is a study of the inter-relatedness of literature, painting, sculpture and music.  Students study the key themes and images which evolve from the time of the Ancient Greeks, through the Middle Ages and Renaissance, Baroque, the Romantics and Victorians, into the 20th century.  This course expands the understanding of what it means to be a human in the modern world. Heavy emphasis is placed on reading and writing at an elevated level in preparation for stringent demands in college.  The successful completion of a research paper is required.  CR 5, YO 12, Suggested PRE Honors English 3 or 90 or better in English 3 CP, or teacher recommendation.


    English 4 CP Humanities (1115) – This course is a study of the inter-relatedness of literature, painting, sculpture and music.  Students study the key themes and images which evolve from the time of the Ancient Greeks, through the Middle Ages and Renaissance, Baroque, the Romantics and Victorians, into the 20th century.  This course expands the understanding of what it means to be a human in the modern world.  The successful completion of a research paper is required.  CR 5, YO 12, PRE English 3


    Creative Writing 1 (1150) – Fall – This course follows the premise that to write well, one must know good writing.  Creative Writing 1 requires students to study major works of European and American prose, poetry, and drama in an effort to assess each writer’s style and creative strategy.  Students then incorporate what they learn into their own original works.  CR 2.5, YO 9,10,11,12


    Creative Writing 2 (1151) – Spring – This course is a workshop class for those students who enjoyed Creative Writing 1 and who wish to continue writing poetry, short stories and plays.  Students will become more sensitive to themselves and to life through the process of writing.  They will learn and become familiar with literary techniques and practice their use, and gain critical insight into what makes good writing by reading and evaluating pieces written for the class.  CR 2.5, YO 9,10,11,12


    Film Studies (1152) – This elective course is an introduction to the art of film.  The students will learn about film terminology, tools and techniques, different modes and models of criticism, interpretation and film theory, as well as the history of film and the film industry.  The students will utilize Stephen Prince's Movies and Meaning as their textbook.  CR 2.5, YO 11,12


    Gender Studies Literature (1157)This course introduces students to a variety of works, fiction and non-fiction, by writers representing the female and LGBT perspective. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles and to also address significant cultural aspects of the works. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work presents an understanding of society’s views regarding gender roles. Class assignments and activities will be linked to the Common Core through various readings, written assignments and a culminating research project. CR 2.5, YO 11, 12


    Introduction to Philosophy (1159)—This course is an introduction to the examination of the “big questions” geared toward helping students learn to articulate their worldview and take a stand on the meaning of life. Through current topics, it introduces students to the overarching issues explored by philosophers and lets them explore some of the more famous thinkers while critiquing their positions. Students will read, write about and discuss the works, but they will also directly respond to and develop their own positions. CR 2.5, YO 10


    Advanced Graphic Novels and Visual Literacy (1155)-- In this rigorous full-year course, students will explore the connection between the visual and literary arts by learning about the long history behind today’s graphic novels from around the world.  Students will investigate how graphic novels must carefully balance between narratives told through images and words, and how line, color, composition, visual pacing and tone contribute a text’s meaning.  Student will also explore topics such as censorship, translations between different media, heroic archetypes, the art of storytelling, and much more.  Students should have an interest in literature or the visual arts, but specific prior knowledge of graphic novels is not required.  Class activities will include reading graphic novels and graphic-narrative theory and scholarship, discussion of various texts, and creative and analytical writing. This course will be a concurrent enrollment course offered through Fairleigh Dickinson University where students may earn 3 college credits upon payment of a reduced tuition and successful completion of the course. CR 5, YO 11,12


    Honors Philosophy (2200)This challenging course takes student on a tour of the history of thought, integrating the study of the most influential philosophers with the chance to develop and defend original perspectives. The course progresses from Ancient Greece to modern day, exploring the "big questions" of Being, Knowledge and Action through a broad variety of media examples, thought experiments and project-based assessments. Interested students should be prepared for scholarly discussion and advanced readings and research assignments, but also for an intellectually enriching experience that will expand their horizons of critical thought." CR 5, YO 11,12


    Multicultural Literature  (1158) - This course focuses on literature and folklore by and about people of diverse ethnic backgrounds. Students explore themes of linguistic and cultural diversity by comparing, contrasting, analyzing, and critiquing writing styles and universal themes. This course emphasizes critical and creative thinking and writing. Class assignments and learning activities will be designed to reinforce Common Core skills and provide opportunities for students to express their abilities in a variety of mediums. Various print and non-print texts from many cultures and subcultures will be discussed and analyzed through written, verbal and nonverbal methods. An emphasis will be placed on becoming an active rather than passive consumer of texts. CR 2.5, YO 11, 12


    Public Speaking (1154) - This is a basic course for the student with little knowledge of, but a curiosity about, the skills necessary for public speaking.  The course is designed to introduce the student to the basic aspects of public speaking by simulating numerous public speaking scenarios.  The course involves both written and oral critiques of performances.  Preparation for the performance assignments is the major homework component.  CR 2.5, Y0 10,11,12


    Sports and Literature (1156) – This course is made for the sports buff who also enjoys reading.  This course will expose students to depiction of sports in different literary genres.  Students will examine novels, short stories, films, articles, and speeches from many famous authors, journalists and athletes throughout history.  The daily newspaper will supplement outside reading and viewing.  All materials will be examined for literary elements and provide models for students’ experiments with this style of writing.  CR 2.5, YO 10,11,12

  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER COURSES


    ELL 1 (1200) – Using a four-skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking) approach, students gain a solid foundation in essential skills and strategies through authentic literature and informational readings.  This course is designed for newcomer students as a means of building academic skills to be further developed in subsequent English Language Learner courses. The course focuses on the following:


    • Reading Practice that includes Content Area Readings in social studies, science, math, literature, and history.
    • Functional Language.
    • Basic grammatical concepts.
    • Vocabulary development.
    • Learning strategies.
    • Cultural aspects of formal and informal settings in the U.S.
    • Critical/close reading skills
    • Incorporating the use of textual evidence
    • identifying primary and secondary resources
    • technology skills and use of academic databases

     


    These classes meet for a full block both A & B days.  CR 10, YO 9,10,11,12


    ELL 2 (1201) – In this course students continue to develop academic content-area vocabulary.  Students develop proficiency in using their understanding of grammatical structures, cultural knowledge and language arts skills in context.  Students read a wide variety of thematically linked selections, including literature and informational texts.  Each selection helps students develop their understanding of the academic language necessary for school as well as the viewing, listening, speaking, and writing skills they need to begin to transition into the mainstream curriculum.  These classes meet for a full block both A & B days.  CR 10, YO 9,10,11,12


    ELL 3 (1203) – The third in the series, this class is for more advanced ELL students.  This class refines student writing skills, development of grammar and literary elements. Students will explore in depth literary analysis skills. The class will support the student endeavors in the general education classes which may include public speaking skills, analytical writing support, as well providing additional support for developing PARCC related skills.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12


    ELL 4 (1204) – This is a supplemental ELL course for the highest level ELL student. The third in the series, this class is for more advanced ELL students.  This class refines student writing skills, development of grammar and literary elements. Students will explore in depth literary analysis skills. The class will support the student endeavors in the general education classes which may include public speaking skills, analytical writing support, as well providing additional support for developing PARCC related skills.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12

  • FAMILY, CONSUMER AND LIFE SCIENCE COURSES


    Baking Arts (6679) – This course introduces the student to the ingredients, processes, terminology, and equipment of basic baking.  The student will prepare a variety of quick breads, yeast breads, cakes, cupcakes, pies, cookies, and special desserts.  Information about ingredients, measurement, substitutions, chemical reactions, and nutrition is included.  Skills in mixing, kneading, rolling, decorating, and attractive presentation are featured.  Each student will collect recipes to make their own cookbook.  The students will use their skills and creativity to provide baked goods for school, family, and friends, and the community. CR 2.5, YO 10, 11,12


    Child and Personal Development (6676) –  The course begins with the study of children from the prenatal stage through middle childhood.  The physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and moral development of each age is covered.  Emphasis is placed on useful child care skills and positive methods of behavior management.  Projects include children’s nutrition, toy analysis, creative story presentation, and an infant simulator experience.  The course continues with personal development and independent living skills.  Money management, budgeting, bank accounts, check writing, and consumer skills are included.  Additional topics of study include nutrition, interior design, and sewing (hand and machine).  The class is a prerequisite for Preschool Lab.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12


    Commercial Foods (6675) – Students will develop recipes, plan menus, and simulate a catering business by preparing and presenting food for large groups of people.  Students will also get to see what it takes to run a restaurant through on-site visits to some of the area’s food establishments.  CR 5, YO 12, PRE Advanced Foods, International Culinary Experience, Teacher Recommendation


    Creative American Cuisine (6674) – Students will utilize their knowledge and skill acquired in Foods 1 & 2 and focus on preparing various types of American cuisine while placing a creative influence on the traditional preparations of the food of our country. CR 2.5, YO 11,12, PRE Foods 1; Foods 2


    Fashion 1, Art and Design (6670) – This is an introductory semester course on fashion design. Emphasis will be placed on art, design and illustration.  Using a variety of materials, students will study the aesthetics and basic principles of design (i.e. color, balance and rhythm).  Students will have opportunities to create their own fashion statements.  This course may include trips to museums and/or fashion events. CR 5, YO 10,11,12, PRE Art 1


    Fashion 2 (6678) – The students will begin with a review of the human anatomy for assessment.. The students will begin to understand the development of the child to adulthood, age, size and height. Drawing and design will continue from level 1 but advance to male and child. By MP 2, construction of the student’s designs will become the main focus. Students will continue to read and learn about designers and begin to venture into areas outside of design and construction, such as buying/selling, window display and merchandising. Guest artists will be brought into the classroom and fashion internships/college visits will be encouraged. Level 1 and 2 will end with a strong, well rounded body of work required for the college portfolio. CR 5, YO 11, 12 PRE Fashion 1

    Foods 1 (6671) – This is a semester course in safety and sanitation in the kitchen. Students will be expected to develop skills in using the correct tool for the right task, basic food preparation, measuring ingredients accurately, planning food shopping for nutritious family meals, mealtime etiquette, budgeting and comparison shopping.  Knife Skills and various cooking techniques will be stressed.  CR 2.5, YO 10,11,12


    Foods 2 (6672) Foods 2 is a semester course designed to introduce students to the culinary arts as a profession. Students will explore various cooking techniques. Emphasis in this course is given to the development of basic competencies related to the culinary arts profession, food preparation, basic menus and recipes, standardization, and kitchen procedures. CR 2.5, YO 10,11,12 PRE Foods 1


    International Culinary Experience (6673) – Travel around the globe by preparing various cuisines that countries have to offer while learning about their traditions and culture through food. Authenticity is stressed in the preparation of food while customs and values of particular countries are explored.  CR 2.5, YO 11, 12, PRE Foods 1; Foods 2


    Pre-School Lab 1/2 (6677/6677A) – In this full-year laboratory course, students plan and operate a nursery school for preschool children.  High school students study child guidance, curriculum planning, and techniques for teaching preschoolers.  They prepare lesson plans and act as the teacher of the day.  This course offers students an opportunity to interact with children and learn about child development and behavior through a personal experience.  This class is an excellent prerequisite for a career related to children as well as for personal enrichment.  CR 10, YO 11,12, PRE Child and Personal Development


    Tomorrow’s Teachers (2255) - The primary goal of this program is to encourage academically able students who possess exemplary interpersonal and leadership skills to consider teaching as a career. It includes three themes: Experiencing the Learner; Experiencing the Profession; and Experiencing the Classroom. A variety of hands-on activities and a strong emphasis on observations, and field experiences are provided. This is a concurrent enrollment course offered through Fairleigh Dickinson  University where students may earn 3 college credits upon payment of a reduced tuition and successful completion of the course. CR 5, YO 12


    Freshman Survey (6669) - In this survey course, students will be introduced to key aspects of the Red Bank Regional school community.  The course is divided into four key sections.  In the first session, students will focus on the multiple career opportunities they will be exposed to at RBR.  In the second session, students will develop key 21st Century skills including an infusion in current technology such as Google Classroom and Microsoft Office.  During the third section, students will develop their interpersonal and communication skills.  Finally, students will be exposed to the many aspects of global citizenship as they will eventually journey outside “Buc Nation” and into the world.  Throughout the course, students will create a portfolio of their best work that will culminate during the final section of study.  CR 5, YO 9

  • MATHEMATICS COURSES


    ELL Foundations of Algebra (1211) – This is the first course in a two year Algebra 1 sequence designed for newcomer students as a means of building mathematics and language skills that will be further developed in subsequent math courses. Course content is determined based on student aptitude with the goal of strengthening algebraic skills by the end of the course.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11


    Algebra 1 (3302) – This course develops an understanding and modeling of a variety of real world situations using Algebra. Skills include operations with real numbers, exponents and polynomials, and working with radical expressions and equations.  Successful completion of the course builds on prior knowledge of linear functions and includes graphing and finding solutions for linear, quadratic, exponential, piecewise and absolute value functions, systems of equations, and inequalities.  In addition, transformations of these functions will be a focus of study. Modeling includes both abstract and concrete forms of representation for a complete understanding of Algebra.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11


    Honors Geometry (3306, 3307)- This course integrates algebraic and geometric concepts to provide both abstract and real-world applications of geometry, and the development of inductive and deductive reasoning, communication skills, and problem-solving techniques. Students will discover relationships between two and three dimensional geometric figures, study transformations and rigid motions, and learn to reason logically in order to solve abstract geometric proofs.  Formal geometric constructions will be completed in order to discover and verify relationships between figures. Reasoning will also be applied to the study of congruence and similarity, relationships found in circles, and real-world applications. This course provides students with the conceptual framework, practical application, and analytical skills necessary to meet the needs of strong mathematics students and support their future study in mathematics and science. CR 5, YO 9, 10, 11 Suggested PRE: Algebra 1 with an average of 90 or higher and a teacher recommendation.


    Geometry (3308) – This course integrates algebraic and geometric concepts as students discover relationships between two and three dimensional geometric figures, study transformations and reason logically in a step-by-step approach in order to solve geometric proofs and real-world applications.  Logical reasoning is also applied in finding measurements, including  area and volume, length of segments, degrees of angles, area and perimeter of polygons, and applications of the distance and slope formulas. Transformations are applied in the study of congruent and similar figures, including the completion of geometric proofs.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, Suggested PRE Algebra 1 with an average of 75 or higher


    Geometry Concepts & Applications (3310) – This course reinforces algebraic concepts while students examine the relationships between two and three dimensional geometric figures. Logical reasoning and constructions are used to help students discover relationships between parallel and perpendicular lines, as well as triangle, quadrilateral, polygon and circle relationships.  Transformations are applied in the study of congruent and similar figures. Skills development within meaningful contexts helps students connect geometry to real life applications.   CR 5, YO 10,11,12, PRE Algebra 1 with an average less than 75
    Honors Algebra 2 (3325) – This rigorous course is designed for the strong mathematics student in preparation for Honors Pre-Calculus.  Topics covered include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, polynomial and rational expressions, and sequences and series, with an emphasis on modeling and real-world applications. Students also study radicals, irrational numbers, complex numbers, quadratic relations and systems, exponents and logarithms, conic sections, trigonometry, and probability and statistics.  Throughout this course students will use technology to facilitate their understanding of the topics being studied. CR 5, YO 10,11, Suggested PRE Algebra 1 and Geometry with averages of 90 or higher and a teacher recommendation.


    Algebra 2 (3320) – Algebra 2 is the second course in the Algebra sequence, continuing the study of linear and non- linear functions. Students will analyze and interpret polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational equations and functions, trigonometric functions, trigonometry, and probability and statistics, with an emphasis on modeling and problem-solving. Throughout this course students will relate topics to real-world applications and use technology to facilitate their understanding of the topics being studied. Algebra 2 provides the framework of mathematical skills and knowledge needed for advanced courses in mathematics. CR 5, YO 10, 11, 12, Suggested PRE Algebra 1 and Geometry with averages of 75 or higher


    Algebra 2 Concepts (3324) – This course builds on the concepts begun in Algebra 1, developing a deeper understanding of linear and non- linear functions. Study includes abstract concepts and applications including real numbers, equations and inequalities, polynomials, rational expressions and functions, exponents, radicals, linear and quadratic equations, trigonometry, and probability and statistics, with an emphasis on modeling and problem solving.. Throughout this course students will use real-world applications and technology to facilitate their understanding of the topics being studied.  CR 5, YO 11,12 PRE Algebra 1 & Geometry with averages less than 75


    Honors Pre-Calculus (3327) – A challenging course for the strong math student stressing work with polynomial, trigonometric, logarithmic, exponential and inverse functions.  Topics covered include analytic trigonometry, vectors, parametric and polar functions, matrices, and analytic geometry in three dimensions.  Discrete mathematics and an introduction to Calculus then provide each student with a thorough background for the study of calculus. CR 5, YO 10, 11, 12 Suggested PRE Geometry and Algebra 2 (3320) with an average of 90 or higher or Honors Algebra 2 (3325) with an average of 85 or higher


    Pre Calculus (3326) – This course provides the essential understanding of trigonometry and the study of functions and their graphical characteristics that are needed for further coursework in mathematics.  Topics include linear, quadratic and polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, analytical trigonometry, and conic sections.  This course culminates with an introduction to Calculus, providing a strong background for higher level math coursework. CR 5, YO 11,12, Suggested PRE Algebra 2 (3321) with an average of 80 or higher


    Calculus (3328) – A non-honors full-year course that introduces the fundamental elements of differential and integral calculus by including functions, limits, derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, derivatives of exponential and logarithmic functions, anti-derivatives, definite integrals, trigonometric functions, techniques of integration, and simple differential equations. CR 5, YO 12, Suggested PRE Pre-Calculus with an average of 80 or higher


    AP Calculus AB (3329) – A full-year course in calculus following the AP syllabus recommended by C.E.E.B.  Topics include differentiation and integration of polynomial, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions with such practical applications of the above as maximum-minimum area under a curve, and solids of revolution. Students are expected to take the AP exam.  CR 5, YO 12, PRE Honors Pre-Calculus average 80 or higher or Pre-Calculus with an average of 90 or higher, completion of summer independent study project, and teacher recommendation


    AP Calculus BC (3330) – An intensive full-year course in calculus following the AP syllabus recommended by C.E.E.B.  It is a course in the calculus of functions of a single variable.  It includes all topics covered in Calculus AB plus additional topics in the areas of:  Functions, Graphs, and Limits; Applications and Computation of Derivatives; Applications of Integrals; Techniques of Antidifferentiation; and Polynomial Approximations and Series.  Students are expected to take the AP exam.  CR 5, YO 11,12, PRE Honors Pre-Calculus with an average of 90 or higher, successful completion of summer work, and teacher recommendation.


    Multivariable Calculus (3333) – This advanced calculus course is designed for students interested in majoring in science, mathematics, or engineering.  The course covers vectors and the geometry of space, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals.  CR 5 YO 11, 12 PRE AP Calculus BC.  


    AP Statistics (3341) – This intensive course is designed for students planning to continue their studies in mathematics or science.  This course follows the AP Statistics syllabus as outlined by the College Board.  The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.   Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns and statistical inference. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to design an experiment, collect appropriate data, select and use statistical techniques to analyze the data, and develop and evaluate inferences based on the data. Ideas and computations presented in this course will have immediate links and connections with actual events. Graphing calculators and computer software will be utilized as tools for data analysis. Students are expected to take the AP exam.  Note: Students who are considering any math related field of study in college should not take AP Statistics in lieu of PreCalculus/Calculus but may wish to take AP Statistics in addition to these courses. CR 5, YO 11,12 Suggested PRE PreCalculus  with an average of 85 or higher.


    Statistics (3340) – This full year math course covers statistical concepts necessary for those planning to continue their studies in a social science, business or engineering field.    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts and techniques for collecting and analyzing data, drawing conclusions from data, and making predictions about data.  The emphasis in this course will be on concepts and practical uses of statistics in research studies and the media, rather than in-depth coverage of traditional statistical methods.  Students will work on projects involving hands-on gathering and analysis of real-world data with applications that may be drawn from a variety of disciplines, including the social sciences of psychology and sociology, education, business, economics, engineering, the humanities, communications, and liberal arts.  Graphing calculators and computer software will be utilized as tools for data analysis. Note: Students who are considering any math related field of study in college should not take Statistics in lieu of PreCalculus/Calculus but may wish to take Statistics in addition to these courses CR 5, YO 11, 12, Suggested PRE Algebra 2 with an average of 80 or higher


    IB Mathematics SL (3374)– This is an intensive course which builds on students’ knowledge of Algebra 2 and Pre-Calculus.  The course focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques.  The major topics studied in this course are: Differential Calculus, Integral Calculus, and Statistics.  Sequences, Series, Binomial Expansion, and Vectors will also be studied in more depth than students encountered previously. For the IB internal assessment, an independent 8-12 page mathematical paper will be completed on a topic covered in the course.  The course culminates with the IB External Assessment, consisting of Paper 1, which does not allow a calculator, and Paper 2, which does allow a calculator.  Both papers are made up of both short-response and extended-response questions on the whole syllabus, which includes knowledge from Pre-Calculus topics.  CR 5, YO 11,12, Suggested PRE: Honors Pre-Calculus or Pre-Calculus with an average of 85 or higher.


    IB Mathematical Studies SL (3370) – This rigorous course is a survey of mathematics designed for 4-year university bound students whose primary concentration of study is not STEM areas. The focus of this course is the relationship of mathematics to other subjects of study and to the world around us.  The primary purpose is to develop the critical thinking skills of students and to give them an appreciation of the many ways that mathematics can be used to better understand natural phenomena and current events.  The material covered in this course will help prepare students to solve problems dealing with the following areas:  Introductory Differential Calculus, Numbers and Algebra, Sets and Logic, Probability, Statistics, Functions, Geometry and Trigonometry, and Financial Mathematics.  The course culminates with the IB Exam, consisting of two Papers, the first comprising on short-answer responses and the second with extended-responses. Both papers allow use of a graphing calculator. The course also requires students to write an IB Internal Assessment, an independent 7-10 page mathematical paper on a topic covered in the course. CR 5, YO 12 Suggested PRE: Algebra 2 & Geometry with an average of 80 or higher.


    Applied/Discrete Math (3350) – This full year course focuses on problem solving methods, mathematical applications, and college readiness skills while reviewing the fundamentals of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and data analysis. Discrete math topics include set theory, data collection and analysis, functions and relations, matrix algebra, combinatorics and finite probability, graph theory, recurrence relations, logic, mathematical induction, and algorithmic thinking.  Preparation for SAT tests and college placement exams is integrated throughout the course.  CR 5, YO 11,12, PRE Algebra 2

  • PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH/DRIVER TRAINING COURSES


    Physical Education 9 (8000), 10 (8010), 11 (8020), 12 (8030) – Physical Education is a required four-year course in which students will improve their physical fitness and develop an awareness of lifetime physical activities.  Freshmen and sophomore classes provide an introduction to team sports and the Adventure Education program, the junior and senior classes focus on lifetime activities.  Team sports may include football, soccer, lacrosse, softball and basketball and the lifetime sports that include volleyball, badminton, pickleball, tennis, as well as weight training and fitness.  Students are graded on participation, skill development and a written final is taken for each activity to assess their knowledge of the activity.  CR 3.75, YO 9,10,11,12
    Health 9 (8001) – Health Education in grade nine is a required course in which students are scheduled for a marking period from their physical education class.  The course examines the topics of wellness, and the personality growth and physical maturation of the adolescent.  Activities include individual and group projects, tests, quizzes, and homework assignments.  CR 1.25, YO 9


    Health 10 – Driver’s Ed (8011) – Health Education in grade ten is a required course in which students are scheduled for a marking period from their physical education class and is focused on driver education.  Topics include licensing, registration of vehicles, insurance regulations, rules of the road, driving techniques and attitudes.  Students will be given the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission written test at the conclusion of the course.  A minimum grade of 80 will exempt the student from the written portion of the licensing test.  Activities include homework assignments, quizzes, and projects.  CR 1.25, YO 10


    Health 11 (8021) – Health Education in grade eleven is a required course in which students are scheduled for a marking period from their physical education class.  The course examines the topics of family management, parenthood, sexually transmitted diseases, teen pregnancy and relationships, stress management, alcohol, tobacco, and drug use.  Activities include a marriage project, tests, quizzes, and homework assignments.  CR 1.25, YO 11


    Health 12 – CPR/First Aid (8031) – Health Education in grade twelve is a required course in which students are scheduled for a marking period from their physical education class.  Topics include skills in CPR certification for adult, child and infant, and first aid.  The American Red Cross test will be administered at the conclusion of the course and students may become certified. Activities for the course include quizzes, tests and homework assignments.  CR 1.25, YO 12


    Foundations of Exercise Science and Wellness (8050) -- This course offers an introduction to wellness through investigation of lifestyle and other critical issues in fitness, sports, exercise science and wellness.  Changing philosophies and basic concepts are introduced. This is a concurrent enrollment course offered through Georgian Court University where students may earn 3 college credits upon payment of a reduced tuition and successful completion of the course. CR 2.5, YO 12. Recommended PRE Biology and Chemistry with an average of 80.


    Introduction to Sports and Entertainment Marketing (8016)The students will receive an introductory look at the components of a marketing plan, primarily the marketing mix.  Students will identify the similarities and differences between sports and entertainment and other products, with the primary focus on gaining an understanding of the four components of the marketing mix. In addition, the students will be responsible for designing a new product, as well as, analysis of various pricing and distribution considerations and strategies.  The students are introduced to market research techniques and general market segmentation categories.  The importance of the branding process and the various branding strategies are implemented to differentiate the products.   Methods used to create additional revenue streams, such as licensing and sponsorship agreements, are also discussed. Lastly, the students are responsible for the


    promotional planning of their new products through the marketing plan.  Completion of this course AND Introduction to Sports Management will satisfy 2.5 credits toward the 21st Century Life and Careers requirement / CR. 2.5, YO 10 – Sports Medicine & Management


    Introduction to Sports Medicine (8015) – This course will introduce the student to the fields of allied health care and sports medicine.  Career exploration will include athletic training, medicine, physical therapy, emergency medicine, nursing, exercise physiology, nutritionist/dietician, personal fitness training.  Topics will include but are not limited to:  care, prevention, and rehabilitation of sports related injuries, basic anatomy and physiology, emergency care, strength and conditioning, nutritional aspects, fitness and wellness.  Students will have opportunities to develop their skills and knowledge through the use of various text, visual, and hands-on experiences.  Guest lecturers and field trips will also be utilized in this course.  Completion of this course AND Introduction to Sports Management will satisfy 2.5 credits toward the 21st Century Life and Careers requirement.CR 2.5, YO 10


    Nutrition in Exercise, Wellness & Sports (8051)This college-level course will examine why nutrition is significant and its relationship to the human body. Students will acquire a general body of nutrition knowledge based on scientific principles. Student s will explore a variety of controversial issues related to food and nutrition and explain the importance of balancing nutrition with physical fitness. This is a concurrent enrollment course offered through Georgian Court University where students may earn 3 college credits upon payment of a reduced tuition and successful completion of the course. CR 2.5, YO 12 Juniors may take this course with the instructor’s approval. Recommended PRE Biology and Chemistry with an average of 80.


    Introduction to Sports Administration (8052) –SPAD1004--This course will provide an overview of the issues, trends and concerns of the industry.  Students will learn current practices and procedures used by practitioners in the field.  Students will be introduced to different occupations and job titles currently in place.  Students are expected to begin developing the skills and experiences necessary to be successful as a sports executive. This is a concurrent enrollment course offered through Fairleigh Dickinson  University where students may earn 3 college credits upon payment of a reduced tuition and successful completion of the course. CR 5, YO 12.  


    Sports & Hospitality Marketing Management (8018) – This course is an extension of the introductory course and expands upon the research process as well as and operational aspects of event management.  This course is designed to allow students to apply their understanding of general marketing concepts to create a fictitious sports franchise, where responsibilities will include market research and analysis for a new stadium location, as well as planning of a particular event and identifying sources of revenue generators.  Through project-based learning assignments, the students are exposed to all elements of the Marketing Mix and conduct market research and analysis to assist in the evaluation and selection of a potential site during the product planning phase for their franchise. The students are introduced to the market segmentation process and the various methods used to target potential consumers.  The students learn about the branding process, the role of product licensing and their agreements as well as development and maintenance of the product mix and will be responsible for creating the branding strategy and image for their newly developed franchise. In addition, students will gain an understanding about the facility design and operations through activities such as, ticket pricing, sponsorship and concession agreements, event staffing, and security issues and concerns. The students are responsible for the establishment of an event and subsequent development of the promotional strategies, the factors influencing the promotional mix and the evaluation of the marketing communications.  CR: 5, YO: 11, Pre: AOF - Intro to Marketing, SMM – Intro to Sports and Entertainment Marketing


    Sports Medicine 2 (8017) – This course will further introduce the student to the fields of allied health care.  Students will gain practical knowledge in the care, prevention, and rehabilitation of sports related injuries, basic anatomy and physiology, emergency care, strength and conditioning, nutritional aspects in sports, fitness/wellness and sports performance.  Students will have opportunities to develop their skills and knowledge through the use of various text, visual, and hands-on experiences.  Entry level college/university degree programs look favorably upon students who have had previous experience in the allied health care fields.  Recommended PRE Intro to Sports Medicine with an average of 80. CR 5, YO 11

  • SCIENCE COURSES


    Exploratory Science (4401) – Exploratory Science combines the study of chemistry and biology with the development of student analytical skills. Topics of study include scientific processes, atomic structure and arrangement, chemical bonding, biochemistry, and cell structure and function with a focus on data analysis and written applications. Emphasis is placed upon the development of scientific methods, analysis and evaluation based on observation, experimentation, and class discussions. Laboratory experiences and demonstrations are constantly utilized throughout the course, providing the opportunity for students to collect and use data in a scientific setting. CR 5, YO 9


    Biology (4403 Grade 9, 4405) – This course provides an understanding of structure and function of living things.  It examines the chemistry of life, cells, genetics and heredity, evolution, classification and diversity, and ecology.   Emphasis is placed upon the development of scientific methods and analysis and evaluation based on observation, experimentation, and class discussions.  Laboratory experiences and demonstrations are constantly utilized throughout the course.  CR 5 or 6, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE 9th grade or completion of Exploratory Science (4401)


    AP Biology (4410) – This intensive course examines molecular, cellular, organism, and population biology through the study of chemical basis, cells, enzymes, energy transformation, cell division, chemical nature of gene, origin of life, plant structure and function with emphasis on angiosperms, plant reproduction and development, animal structure and function with emphasis on vertebrates, animal reproduction, development, heredity, evolution, ecology, behavior.  The course follows the CEEB guidelines including labs.  Students are expected to take the AP exam and participate in dissections.  CR 6, YO 11,12  Suggested PRE 90 or higher in Biology (4403, 4405) and Chemistry (4430, 4440), completion of summer work, and teacher recommendation.


    IB Biology SL (4490) - The intent of this rigorous course is to provide students with a holistic approach to the study of living things. The specific emphasis is on a practical approach through experimental work where students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. Topics of study include cellular biology, molecular biology, genetics, ecology, evolution and biodiversity, human physiology, along with an additional option. Students will have opportunities to design investigations, collect data, develop manipulative skills, analyze results, collaborate with peers and evaluate and communicate their findings. All students enrolled in the course are required to complete a 10-hour investigation resulting in a research paper (internal assessment) as well as the IB exam (external assessment), integral parts of the certificate and diploma processes. CR: 6, YO 11, 12 PRE 85 or higher in Biology & Chemistry, and teacher recommendation.


    Biomedical Science (4485) - This course is intended for college-bound students who are pursuing a career in the medical or health science field.  Students will explore medical terminology, medical professions, clinical laboratory assessments, and pathology associated with several areas of specialty, including but not limited to emergency medicine, cardiology, neurology, dermatology, and infectious disease. CR 5, YO 11, 12 PRE 85 or higher in Biology.


    Chemistry (4430) – This course will provide students with a comprehensive up-to-date approach to an extensive study of matter. Topics studied include those traditionally taught in an introductory course in chemistry such as atomic structure, periodic table, chemical composition, gas laws, and solutions and their behavior.  Emphasis is also placed on performing and understanding stoichiometric calculations. Laboratory experiences and demonstrations are constantly utilized throughout the course. CR 5 or 6, YO 10,11,12 PRE Biology and Algebra 1.


    Honors Chemistry (4440) – This rigorous course stresses the relations between structure and properties of matter, but also demonstrates the relation of chemistry to mathematics and physics.  This math-intensive course is designed to give students an understanding of the fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry throughout the development of the laws and theories that give a logical interpretation of chemical phenomena while emphasizing the mathematical foundation of modern chemical theory.  Emphasis is also placed on the relationship of atomic structure and bonding to the physical and chemical properties of substances.  Laboratory experiences and demonstrations are constantly utilized throughout the course. This class will prepare students who are interested in taking AP Chemistry.  CR 5 or 6, YO 10,11, Suggested PRE Biology and Algebra 1 with a grade of 90 or higher, teacher recommendation and Advanced Proficient on the NJ BCT.


    Honors Advanced Topics in Chemistry (4445)- This course is a continuation of the development of fundamental chemistry principles and their application. The topics that will be covered include science and ethics, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction reactions, equilibrium reactions, reaction kinetics, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving skills to better prepare students for careers in chemistry and/or related science fields.  CR 6, YO 11, 12 Suggested PRE Chemistry with a grade of 90 or higher or Honors Chemistry with a grade of 80 or higher and Algebra I with a grade of 80 or higher.


    AP Chemistry (4450) – This fast-paced, intensive course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first year of college.  It is intended for those students whose academic needs are directed towards careers in medicine, engineering, pharmacy and related fields of similar demands. This course is structured around the six big ideas articulated in the AP Chemistry curriculum framework provided by the College Board. A special emphasis will be placed on the seven science practices (curricular requirements), which capture important aspects of the work that scientists engage in, with learning objectives that combine content with inquiry and reasoning skills. The course investigates advanced concepts in atomic structure, chemical bonding, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, group analysis, and qualitative analysis of organic chemistry.  A minimum of 25% of instructional time will be spent performing hands-on lab experiments. Students are expected to take the AP exam.  CR 6, YO 11,12, Suggested PRE Honors Chemistry with a grade of 90 or higher, Algebra I with a grade of 90 or higher, completion of summer assignments and teacher recommendation.


    Physics (4460) – This algebra-based course introduces the traditional topics found in physics: motion, heat, light, kinetic theory, wave motion, gravitation, electromagnetism, and optics.  Laboratory experiences and demonstrations are constantly utilized throughout the course.  CR 5 or 6, YO 11,12, Suggested PRE Biology, Chemistry and Algebra 2 with a grade of 80 or higher


    AP Physics 1/2 (4466) – This course integrates the topics in AP Physics 1 and AP Physics 2 into a one-year intensive study of Physics, following the CEEB guidelines.   Students develop an understanding and appreciation of Physics, applying their knowledge through inquiry labs.   This course covers, among other topics, Newtonian mechanics; work, energy and power; mechanical waves and sound, fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; and atomic and nuclear physics.. The course will provide a challenging, interesting and intellectual atmosphere.  Students are expected to take the AP Physics 1 and AP Physics 2 exams.  CR 6, YO 11,12, Suggested PRE Biology, Chemistry and Algebra 2 with a grade of 90 or higher, completion of summer work, teacher recommendation, and concurrent enrollment in Honors PreCalculus or AP Calculus.


    AP Physics C (4464) – This course investigates advanced concepts in physics and follows the CEEB guidelines including labs.  Topics include mechanics and electricity & magnetism at a level traditionally encountered in first or second years of college.  Methods of calculus studied at the AP Calculus levels are applied extensively.  The course will provide a challenging, interesting and intellectual atmosphere.  Students will be prepared to take the AP C level Physics exam. CR 6, YO 12, Suggested PRE AP Physics 1/2, completion of summer work, teacher recommendation, and concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus.


    IB Physics HL (4497)  –A rigorous course, Physics HL exposes students to this most fundamental experimental science, which seeks to explain the universe itself—from the very smallest particles to the vast distances between galaxies. Students develop traditional practical skills and techniques and increase facility in the use of mathematics, the language of physics. Course topics include:  measurement; mechanics; thermal physics and properties of matter; waves; electricity and magnetism; and atomic and nuclear physics.  In addition, this course is designed to develop an ability to analyze, evaluate and synthesize scientific information, engender an awareness of the need for and the value of effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities, develop experimental and investigative scientific skills, and develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of science.  Further, students enjoy multiple opportunities for scientific study and creative inquiry within a global context. Study includes the impact of physics on society, the moral and ethical dilemmas, and the social, economic and environmental implications of the work of physicists. CR 6, YO 11; Suggested  PRE Completion of Chemistry and Algebra 2 with an average of 85 or higher and teacher recommendation.


    Honors Anatomy and Physiology (4470) – This course for college-bound students is a study of the anatomy and physiology of the major systems of the human body.  The focus will be on the relationship of structure and function in the normal condition.  There will also be some discussion of the common pathologies in the systems covered.  Laboratory experiences and demonstrations are constantly utilized throughout the course. Student responsibilities include dissections, lab reports, reading assignments, research and presentations.  CR 5 or 6, YO 11,12, Suggested PRE Biology and Chemistry with averages of 80 or better This is a concurrent enrollment course offered through Fairleigh Dickinson University where students may earn 3 college credits upon payment of a reduced tuition and successful completion of the course.


    IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL (4494) – The prime intent of this rigorous course is to provide students with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. Students’ attention can be constantly drawn to their own relationship with their environment and the significance of choices and decisions that they make in their own lives. It is intended that students develop a sound understanding of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies, rather than a purely journalistic appreciation of environmental issues. The approach therefore is conducive to students evaluating the scientific, ethical and socio-political aspects of issues. Students meet for mandatory sessions over the summer.  The purpose of these meetings is to complete the topic 1 material as well as take the topic 1 assessment.  An independent research paper is due to complete the IB Internal Assessment, an integral component to the diploma process.  CR 6, YO 11,12, Suggested PRE Chemistry with an average of 75 or higher.


    Environmental Science (4480) – This course is designed to introduce students to major ecological concepts and the environmental problems which affect the world in which they live.  Students explore the impact of technology, examine social issues, and explore possible solutions.  The goal of the course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and man-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.  Laboratory experiences and demonstrations are utilized throughout the course. CR 5 or 6, YO 10, 11,12, PRE Biology and Chemistry (Chemistry may be taken concurrently)


    Forensic Science (4468) – Forensic Science combines Biology, Chemistry and Physics in this rigorous course to provide an introduction to understanding the science behind crime detection. Forensic Science is focused upon the application of scientific methods and techniques to crime and law.  Recent advances in scientific methods and principles have had an enormous impact upon science, law enforcement and the entire criminal justice system.  In this course, scientific methods specifically relevant to crime detection and analysis will be presented.  Emphasis is placed upon understanding the science underlying the techniques used in evaluating physical evidence.  Topics included are blood analysis, organic and inorganic evidence analysis, fingerprints, hair analysis, DNA, drug chemistry, forensic medicine, forensic anthropology, toxicology, fiber comparisons, soil comparisons, and fire and engineering investigations, among others.  Laboratory exercises will include techniques commonly employed in forensic investigations. CR 5 or 6, YO 11, 12, Suggested PRE Biology, Chemistry and Algebra 2 with an average of 85 or higher;  This is a concurrent enrollment course offered through Syracuse University (Chemistry 113) where students may earn 4 college credits upon payment of a reduced tuition and successful completion of the course.

    Marine Science (4481) – This course includes the history and development of marine science, the mechanisms and elements of coastal geology with a field-oriented study focused on Sandy Hook National Recreational Area.  Other topics include an investigation of the chemical and physical properties of seawater, the formation and geological components of oceanic crust, and a study of marine mammals, aves, reptiles, and ichthyology as well as shark physiology (dissections).  Students are expected to participate in field trips and “hands-on” problem solving activities both individually and as a group, write lab reports based on their analysis of data collected during activities and research involving periodicals, journal publications, and internet searches.  Students are expected to complete a Field Guide of local marine life.  CR 5 or 6, YO 10, 11,12, PRE Biology and Chemistry

  • SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES


    Global Studies (2201) – This course will focus on the key political, social, and economic movements that have shaped World History from 1400 A.D. to the present day. Study will center around six geographic areas: Europe, China, India, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Students in Global Studies will also take part in extensive analysis of the Holocaust and other examples of human genocide. Embedded in the program is an “honors option” which may reward students for meeting established criteria. Students who complete work at this level may be eligible for honors credit and a five point honors weight on their final averages. CR 5, YO 9


    Honors US History 1 (2205) – This course begins the first year of a three-year cycle in United States History for motivated students. Intensive study will be done in the critical aspects of historical work. Reading, analyzing, and synthesizing historical materials will be a major focus of the course. Activities will include projects, group work, oral and written reports, outside reading, essays and debates.  CR 5, YO 10, Suggested PRE Completion of Global Studies honors option, 90+ average in Global Studies, an average grade of 80 or above on both the Global Studies mid-term and final examinations, teacher recommendation


    US History 1 CP (2203) – The course will focus on the growth and development of the United States from the colonial period through reconstruction.  Topics will include the constitutional rights, obligations and privileges of citizens in the continually evolving relationship with their government.  Historical facts and the examination of the early years of American history and culture will be covered.  Activities include projects, group work, oral and written reports, speeches and essays. CR 5, YO 10


    AP American History (2209) – This AP program in American History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in American History.  In addition to an interpretive text, the course utilizes supplementary readings, documents, essays and letters to provide chronological and thematic coverage of special periods in American History.  Students taking the course are required to take the AP American History test. CR 5, YO 11, Suggested PRE Honors US 1 (85+ average), US 2 CP (93+ average), attendance at summer sessions and teacher recommendation


    Honors US History 2 (2208) – This is the second year course in a three-year cycle.  Emphasis is placed upon independent research and utilization of the tools of the historian.  Students are encouraged to demonstrate competence in undertaking and completing historical studies of the United States in the twentieth century.  Activities will include simulations, authentic projects, oral presentations, and independent research.  CR 5, YO 11, Suggested PRE 80+ average in Honors US History 1 (2205), 90+ average in US History 1 CP (2203), teacher recommendation


    US History 2 CP (2206) – This course will continue the study of the growth and development of the United States from reconstruction through the twentieth century.  The social, economic, political, and international aspects of our nation will be stressed.  Continued emphasis is made with regard to contributions made by women and various ethnic groups.  Activities will include Native American simulation, propaganda project, journal project, oral reports, and essay tests. CR 5, YO 11, PRE US History 1
    IB History of the Americas HL 1 (2220) – This course is open to any student intending to go to college and specifically meets the IB full diploma requirement for individuals and society (social studies). History of the Americas is a comparative course, which will integrate the histories of Canada, Latin America, and the United States from the 19th Century to the present, as well as World History Topics like The Cold War and 20thC Wars. This course is designed to promote awareness and understanding of the countries in the Western Hemisphere along with a global perspective. An emphasis is placed on critical thinking, analysis of primary sources and historical research.  Students in this class should have average to above average writing skills and above average or college-capable reading skills. In addition to serving as the first year of the IB curriculum for higher level Social Studies, this course counts for graduation purposes as one year of United States history.  The international perspective in Diploma Programme history provides a sound platform for the promotion of international understanding and, inherently, the intercultural awareness necessary to prepare students for global citizenship. Above all, it helps to foster respect and understanding of people and events in a variety of cultures throughout the world.   CR 5, YO 11, PRE US History 1


    Honors US History 3 (2210) – This course will continue the study of the growth and development of the United States from post World War II into the twenty-first century. The social, economic, political and international aspects of our nation will be stressed. Emphasis will be placed on the examination of the United States in its role involving global economics, technology, and international conflicts.  Activities will include class projects, research, oral and written reports, and essay tests. CR 5, YO 12, Suggested PRE Honors US History 2 with an 80+ average or a 90+ average in US History 2 CP (2206) and teacher recommendation


    AP European History (2211) – The goals of the Advanced Placement Program in European History are to develop an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, to develop an ability to analyze historical evidence and to develop an ability to analyze and to express historical understanding in writing.  Students will trace developments in European history through the examination of three central themes: Intellectual and Cultural History, Political and Diplomatic History and Social History. CR 5, YO 11,12, Suggested PRE Honors US 2 (85+ average), AP American History (85+ average), US 2 CP (93+ average), summer sessions, and teacher recommendation


    IB History of the Americas HL 2 (2221) – History of the Americas is a comparative course, which will integrate the histories of Canada, Latin America, and the United States from the 19th Century to the present, as well as World History Topics like The Cold War and 20thC Wars. This course is designed to promote awareness and understanding of the countries in the Western Hemisphere along with a global perspective. An emphasis is placed on critical thinking, analysis of primary sources and historical research.  Students in this class should have average to above average writing skills and above average or college-capable reading skills..  The international perspective in Diploma Programme history provides a sound platform for the promotion of international understanding and, inherently, the intercultural awareness necessary to prepare students for global citizenship. Above all, it helps to foster respect and understanding of people and events in a variety of cultures throughout the world. Students will be expected to complete the IB Internal Assessment and the IB exams in May.  CR 5, YO 12, PRE IB History of the Americas HL1

    American Legal System/Criminal Law (2237) – This course is an elective which examines the evolution of our legal system and its lawmaking process.  Emphasis will be placed on the rights and liabilities as they pertain to freedom of speech, the press, religion, right to privacy, due process and discrimination.  In addition, the course will concentrate on the nature of crimes, jury trials, and juvenile law and provide an understanding of basic legal terms and concepts and how law decisions affect everyday life. CR 2.5, YO 11,12


    Contemporary World Issues 1 (2230)– The courses are two semester courses which survey the major problems confronting Americans in the world today. Each problem will be studied as to its historical origins, geographic location, present status, potential implications and the exploration of possible solutions.  Current political, social and economic questions will be examined utilizing reading, geographic, research and analytical skills.  Activities will include multicultural projects, oral reports, debates, atlas work, editorials, essays and tests.  CR 2.5, YO 10, 11,12


    Global Perspectives (2225)This course explores the nature of international-mindedness which is the ability to consider global issues from international and global perspectives. It draws on a variety of disciplines in human sciences, natural sciences, art and film and encourages debate and dialogue while exploring global political challenges in human rights, ethics, climate change and social media and international/global journalism. This course will also give students the opportunity to develop their research skills by synthesizing diverse sources for a specific purpose and audience. CR 2.5, YO 11, 12 Required course for IB Diploma Candidates, optional for all others


    AP Human Geography (2212) –The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Topics of study include: 1) Geography: Its Nature and Perspectives, 2) Population, 3) Cultural Patterns and Processes, 4) Political Organization of Space, 5) Agricultural and Rural Land Use, 6) Industrialization and Economic Development, and 7) Cities and Urban Land Use. This course will satisfy 2.5 credits toward the 21st Century Life and Careers requirement. CR 5, YO 11, 12


    IB Psychology SL (2224) & IB Psychology HL (2226) –IB Psychology examines the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behavior.  This integrative approach helps students understand how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied.  Through this course of study, students learn to appreciate the diversity of human behavior and explore ethical considerations when conducting psychological research.   There is a focus on one or two options (key areas, such as Human Relationships or Abnormal Psychology) and the replication of a simple experiment, the Internal Assessment, is required. The main distinction between IB Psychology SL and HL is that SL students take part in a one year course, use descriptive statistics on the Internal Assessment and study one option.  Students in HL Psychology, a 2 year course, study all topics much more in depth, carry out a more complicated Internal Assessment by calculating Inferential Statistics, must study two options plus investigate qualitative research methods. CR 5, YO 11,12



    Leadership Through the Eyes of History (2100) –. This class will serve as the Academy of Humanities and Social Sciences Keystone class and explore multiple leadership techniques and styles. Students will explore the effectiveness of leadership styles on decision making. Students will embark on in-depth analysis of historical world leaders throughout history and study their leadership styles, decisions, and impact on the global society. CR 2.5, YO 10  Completion of this course AND Leadership Through the Eyes of Literature will satisfy 1.25 credits toward the 21st Century Life and Careers requirement. CR 2.5, YO 10


    Political Science (2232) – A semester course which examines the political processes from the following points of view: (1) structure, (2) the growth, development and function of political parties, (3) the reciprocal relationships between citizens and their government.  CR 2.5, YO 10, 11,12

    Psychology (2236) – This course offers an academic introduction to various areas in the study of psychology.  The program topics will include: fields and careers in psychology, schools of thought to include historical and contemporary concepts, human development, key people, memory and thinking, various personality theories, dreams and sleep and psychological disorders.  CR 2.5, YO 11,12

    Sociology (2234) – Introduces students to the concepts and methods of the sociologist who studies man as a social being.  Emphasis is placed on analyzing and objectively viewing issues, races and cultures in their own terms.  Activities will include group work, oral presentations, tests, and projects.  CR 2.5, YO 11,12


    IB Theory of Knowledge 1 and 2 (9010 and 9011) – The main goal of the course is to encourage students to think critically about knowledge itself, that is, to focus on how they know, rather than on what they know.  At the heart of the course is the student as knower, surrounded by the ways of knowing (emotion, reason, sense perception, language, imagination, intuition, memory and faith), the areas of knowledge (the arts, natural sciences, human sciences, mathematics, history, ethics, indigenous knowledge systems and religious knowledge systems), and personal beliefs acquired in or out of school, as well as beliefs acquired in various parts of the world.  The goals of this course are to acquire an understanding of what it means to know something as an artist, a scientist, a psychologist, an economist, a mathematician, an historian, a philosopher, etc., no matter where on the planet they are from; how the forms of knowledge acquired are interconnected, and how to think critically.  An international perspective of knowledge will be discussed throughout, comparing and contrasting how people from different countries around the world live in cultures that affect how they acquire, and react to, specific types of knowledge. CR 2.5 per year YO 11 and 12, PRE IB Diploma Program Candidate


  • TECHNOLOGY, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING COURSES

    TECHNOLOGY COURSES


    Computer Aided Design (CAD) (6653) – Using different drawing methods, students learn the language of drawing and how to put their ideas to paper.  Cutting edge Auto-Desk software is used to allow students to design in 2D or 3D and gives the students the ability to solve design problems.  The course is designed for students who have interests in areas such as engineering, interior design, architecture, computer animation, industrial design, and illustration.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Concurrent enrollment in Geometry


    Digital Literacy (IC3)* (6665) – Using project-based instruction and hands-on labs, this course will give students the technology competencies to be successful at college or work.  The course provides an overview of information technology and develops mastery in two IC3 modules: Key applications and Living Online.  The Key Applications module concentrates on acquiring expertise in file management, word processing, spreadsheet functions and presentation applications.  The Living Online module addresses methods for effectively and safely accessing online information.  Students will develop advanced skills in Internet research and will also consider contemporary issues such as netiquette, privacy, and ethical use of digital content.  Completion of this course + Intro to Computer Systems will meet the requirements to take the IC3 Certification exam.  CR 2.5, YO 9,10,11,12 – matching ½ year course should be Financial Literacy


    *Internet and Computing Core Certification (IC3) program is a validated standards-based training and certification program for basic computing and Internet knowledge and skills. Successful completion of IC3 ensures you have the knowledge and skills required for basic use of computer hardware, software, networks, and the Internet.


    Digital Photography (6660) – This introductory course will familiarize the student with the basic principles and concepts of digital photography.  Units of study consist of principles of light, black and white photography, principles of design.  Students will develop proficiency in the areas of digital photography, Adobe Photoshop software, and other photo related computer enhancements.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12


    Invention and Innovation (6652) – The course Invention and Innovation will focus around the process involved in the development of technological products from idea to manufactured product.  Through the use of technology learning activities, students will incorporate skills from all subjects to solve real-world problems by developing actual product prototypes!  Units of study would include areas in Product Research and Development, Materials Science, Manufacturing, Invention/Innovation, Package Design, Patents, Manufacturing History, and Environmental Impacts of Manufacturing Innovation.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, PRE Prototype Design or other Technology course


    Prototype Design (6650) – The Prototype Design course was developed as a Technology Education course. It is designed so that students may blend the creative design process with realistic problem-solving activities, giving them an opportunity to fully realize ideas. The main intent is to help students discover their place on the engineering team and to determine if their aptitudes and interests were in the realm of the scientist, the engineer, the technician, or the craftsperson. Projects relating to several engineering fields are included so students may experience different roles within the team. The half year course content is organized around several themes; the engineering team; the process of design; technical communications: materials science; modeling processes and prototyping, and realistic design projects. In addition, students experience and apply the engineering process to stimulate career awareness. CR 2.5, YO 9,10,11,12


    Transportation Technology (6651) – This course emphasizes the evolution of transportation technology. This is accomplished through activities in the lab that engage students in first hand, activity oriented experiences with technology.  The course acquaints students with Air, Sea and Land transportation systems along with related technological career options.  An interdisciplinary incorporation of science and math is an integral component in teaching Transportation Technology.  Transportation Technology consists of seven units of study: Internal Combustion Engine, Air Transportation, Space Transportation, Water Transportation, Land Transportation, Future Transportation and the Six Vehicle Systems.  Appropriate personal and equipment safety instructions are provided.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, PRE Prototype Design or other Technology course


    Web Design 1 (6627) – This semester course will focus on the three basic design concepts for a Web site:  information design (how to structure information); programming design (getting the site to function), and visual design (what the site will look like).  A commonsense approach to design fundamentals will demonstrate how the Web homepage is a practical tool designed to capture and inform an audience.  Students will be able to design their web pages using Macromedia Dreamweaver and add animations to them using Macromedia Flash and Fireworks.  CR 2.5, YO 10,11,12


    Web Design 2 (6628) – Students will learn the most important topics of HTML including creating multimedia Web pages with hypertext links, tables, frames, forms and cascading style sheets.  Students will learn the basics of XML including creating XML documents and binding data.  Students will design and develop wireless web pages using XHTML and WML.  CR 2.5, YO 10,11,12, PRE Web Page Design 1



    INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COURSES


    AP Computer Science Principles (6640) AP Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles will give students the opportunity to use technology to address real-world problems and build relevant solutions. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in Computer Science. The course involves two performance tasks and a multiple-choice exam.  The programming language for the class is MIT App Inventor. CR 5 YO 9, 10, 11, 12


    Honors Computer Science 2 (6641) -- In this course students will analyze and create games in the Java programming language. In this course students will go through the software design process to create these games from the requirements to working products.  Students will also be creating images using Photoshop.  This course will focus on teaching object oriented and event driven programming concepts, algorithm design, arrays, conditionals and lists. This will help students to prepare for the AP Computer Science A exam. CR 5 YO 10, 11, 12  PRE:  AP Computer Science Principles (with a grade of 85 or higher) and supervisor and teacher recommendation.


    AP Computer Science A (6642) -- AP Computer Science A is a rigorous curriculum that requires students to learn how to solve problems using computers.  AP Computer Science A puts an emphasis on problem solving techniques.  Students will learn Computer Science concepts such as conditionals, looping, object oriented programming and data structures.  The emphasis of the course is on the use of a logical approach and analytical thinking while using a computer to solve problems.  The programming language used in this course is Java.  This course prepares students to take the AP Computer Science A test and will aid them in preparing the Program Dossier and preparing for the IB HL course. YO 11, 12 PRE: Honors Computer Science 2 (with a grade of 85 or higher) or teacher recommendation.


    International Baccalaureate Computer Science HL (6694) -- IB Computer Science HL is a two year course with a rigorous curriculum.  The student will learn problem solving techniques and Computer Science concepts such as conditionals, looping, object oriented programming and data structures.  Students will develop a more in depth understanding of computer mathematics and logic, file organization, a deeper look into system fundamentals, and abstract data structures and algorithms.  The programming language used in this course is Java.  This course prepares students to take the IB Computer Science HL test and will aid them in preparing the Program Dossier. YO 11, 12 PRE:  APCS A/IBCS HL (with a grade of 85 or higher) and instructor approval. Co- requisite: Honors Networking.


    Honors Web and Mobile Application Development (6645) -- In this course the students will be creating applications for to be used on the Internet.  Students will be learning to create databases and create applications to store and access information in the database.  Students will also be learning the CSS involved in making web applications available on mobile devices.  Last the focus will be on creating applications for both the IPhone and Android smart phones.  Students will be continuing on in their studies of and analysis of Data Structures while learning how to create Web and Mobile applications. YO 12 PRE:  APCS A/ IBCS HL (with a grade of 80 or higher) and supervisor and teacher recommendation.


    Introduction to Computer Systems (6690) – Course prepares students to install and modify computer systems, analyze and repair system malfunctions, and install software. Students will learn entry-level computer hardware concepts which include: review of basic electronics, diagnosing of computer systems, proper use of test equipment and tools, testing various operating systems and implementing malware solutions. The curriculum includes hands-on labs in which students design and assemble a computer from components, configure peripherals and implement home networking solutions.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12


    Honors Networking (6691) – Students in this course develop an understanding of the features and functions of networking components and will possess the skills needed to install, configure and troubleshoot basic networking hardware, protocols and services.  The course includes hands-on labs which develop technical ability in the areas of media, topologies, protocols, network implementation, wireless standards and gigabit Ethernet. Course receives weighted credit as an Honors course and students are expected to take the CompTIA Net+ Certification exam.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, PRE Introduction to Computer Systems OR Digital Electronics.  Grade of 85 or better in PRE and teacher recommendation is suggested.


    Honors CyberSecurity (6692) – Coursework covers implementation and monitoring of security on network and computer systems.  Students will learn how to identify and protect against security threats such as hackers, eavesdropping and network attacks, as well as the basics of cryptography and computer forensics. The course includes hands-on labs which provide practice in the implementation of firewalls, certificates, VLANs, and Intrusion Detection.  Course receives weighted credit as an Honors course and students are expected to take the CompTIA Security+ Certification exam.  CR 5, YO 11,12, PRE Honors Networking. Grade of 85 or better in PRE and teacher recommendation is suggested.  This is a concurrent enrollment course offered through Syracuse University where students may earn 3 college credits upon payment of a reduced tuition and successful completion of the course.


    Honors Digital Forensics (6696)  – Course covers the fundamentals of cyber-crime scene analysis. Students will learn:  how to use basic digital information retrieval applications and tools; best practices in securing, acquiring and examining digital data; the various laws and regulations dealing with computer forensics, including the rules of evidence and chain of custody. Students will participate in a weekly blog which examines how the lack of International legal standards affects the fight against cybercrime. The course includes hands-on labs with professional forensic software.  To complete the course, students must complete both a written exam and a practical exam in which they investigate / report on a computer crime scene. Course receives weighted credit as an Honors course. CR 5, YO 12 PRE Honors Networking. Grade of 85 or better in PRE and teacher recommendation is suggested.  



    ENGINEERING COURSES


    Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) (6680) -Students dig deep into the engineering design process, applying math, science, and engineering standards to projects. They work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using 3D modeling software, and use an engineering notebook to document their work. Students will be expected to learn the foundational knowledge used by all engineers today. This course is a pre-requisite for Principles of Engineering and Computer Integrated Manufacturing. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12.


    Digital Electronics (DE) (6681) – How does your iPod work?  How does a computer’s Random Access memory save data?  Digital Electronics is a full year course in which students learn about basic electricity, electronic theories, digital integrated circuits and how digital devices work in our world.  Computer simulation software is used to design and test digital circuitry prior to the actual construction of circuits and devices.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12. PRE: Introduction to Engineering Design or AP Computer Science Principles and Algebra (with a suggested GPA of 85) or instructor approval.


    Honors Principles of Engineering (POE) (6682) – This rigorous, pre-engineering course helps students understand the necessary areas of study that are required for a post-secondary education in engineering.  Emphasis is placed upon the documentation and mathematics necessary for the development of a product, through the Engineering Design Loop and  analysis and evaluation based on observation, experimentation, and class discussions.  Exploring various technology systems and manufacturing processes, students learn how engineers and technicians use applied physics, math, science and technology in the engineering problem solving process to benefit people.  The course also includes concerns about social and political consequences of technological change.  Students enrolled in this course are eligible to test for college credit. To be successful in this intensive curriculum, students should be enrolled in college preparatory mathematics and science.  CR 5, YO 11, 12. PRE: Introduction to Engineering Design or Physics, CP/Honors Geometry (with a suggested GPA of 85), or instructor approval.


    Honors Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) (6683) –Manufactured items are part of everyday life, yet most students have not been introduced to the high-tech, innovative nature of modern manufacturing. This course illuminates the opportunities related to understanding manufacturing.  At the same time, it teaches students about manufacturing processes, product design, robotics, and automation. CR  5, YO 10, 11, 12.  PRE: Introduction to Engineering Design (with a suggested GPA  of 85) and enrolled in CP/Honors Geometry or instructor approval.


    Honors Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) (6684) – Civil Engineering and Architecture is the study of Civil Engineering as it relates to the design and construction of residential and commercial building projects. The course requires a rigorous pace and commitment for a real understanding of the role, impact, and practice of civil engineering and building design as it relates to its impact on the environment. The course includes an introduction to many of the varied factors involved in building design and construction including building components and systems, structural design, storm water management, site design, utilities and services, cost estimation, energy efficiency and careers in the design and construction industry. Students enrolled in this course are eligible to test for college credit.   CR 5, YO 10, 11, 12. PRE: Introduction to Engineering Design and CP/Honors Geometry  (with a suggested GPA of 85) or instructor approval.


    Honors Aerospace Engineering (6685)Through hands-on engineering projects developed with NASA, students learn about aerodynamics, astronautics, space-life sciences, and systems engineering in this Project Lead the Way class (which includes the study of intelligent vehicles like the Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity.)  This course expands horizons with Projects developed with NASA-aerodynamics, astronautics, space-life sciences, and systems engineering.  Students enrolled in this course are eligible to test for college credit.  CR 5, YO 10, 11,12.  Introduction to Engineering Design and teacher recommendation (with a suggested GPA OF 85) or instructor approval.


    Honors Engineering Design and Development (EDD) (6686) – “Don’t you hate it when” … is a common statement made by people that are constantly thinking of ways to improve products or situations.  Engineering Design and Development (EDD) is the course that allows you to design a solution to a technical problem of your choosing.  Now is the chance to eliminate one of the ‘‘Don’t you hate it when”… statements of the world.  This course is an engineering course in which you will work in teams to research, design, and construct a solution to an open-ended engineering problem.  The product development lifecycle and a design process will be used to guide and help your team reach a solution to the problem.  You and your team will present and defend your solution to a panel of outside reviewers at the end of the school year. CR 5, YO 12, Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering and Digital Electronics (with a suggested GPA of 85) and instructor approval.


    Honors Environmental Sustainability (6688) - This rigorous engineering course will introduce environmental issues and use the engineering design process to research and design potential solutions.  Students will be challenged to investigate and design solutions that solve real-world problems related to clean drinking water, a stable food supply, and renewable energy.  This course focuses on developing skills related to designing experiments, conducting research, executing technical skills, documenting design solutions according to accepted technical standards, and creating presentations to communicate solutions. Students enrolled in this course are eligible to test for college credit. CR 5, YO 11, 12 PRE: Introduction to Engineering Design and teacher recommendation.  It is recommended that students have taken two years of science before enrolling in this course.


    Women in Engineering (6654) – This course will provide students with knowledge of various fields of engineering and experiences with the engineering process through participation in problem solving and design activities.  Studying areas of engineering and then applying the engineering process in order to solve real life problems will provide students with a better understanding of how real world situations are addressed.  Many speakers will help motivate the students to consider engineering as a career goal.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, PRE Prototype Design with a passing grade of 80% or better

  • VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS ACADEMY COURSES


    Commercial Photography 1 (7795), 2 (7796), 3 (7797), 4 (7798) – This is a vocational, four-year sequential program.  In addition to learning how to operate the various pieces of photographic equipment, the following activities and projects will develop practical experience in various photographic techniques.  Level 1 will be introduced to the procedure for correctly handling light-sensitive materials, chemicals and basic photographic equipment.  Level 2 will focus on digital photography examining 35mm versus digital.  Photoshop software will be introduced.  Level 3 will work with both 35mm and digital photography.  Innovative and alternative processes will be introduced. Level 4 or AP Studio Art students will work independently to create a cohesive body of work resulting in a final exhibit and portfolio possessing quality prints and overall presentation.  Photo critiques and photo history will be taught throughout the year.  These classes meet for a full block both A & B days. CR 10, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Portfolio/Interview


    Dance 1 (7760), 2 (7761), 3 (7762), 4 (7763) – This is a vocationally focused, four-year sequential program which includes ballet, modern, jazz and hip-hop techniques. In addition to performance, students study dance history, anatomy and physiology, nutrition, careers and cultural influences.  The course includes dance field trips, concerts, and master classes run by professional dancers.  After school rehearsals for concerts are required throughout the year.  These classes meet for a full block both A & B days. CR 10, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Audition


    Interactive Media 1 (6662), 2 (6663), 3 (6664)- This a vocationally focused sequentially program that provides students with advance training in computer applications from Level 1, also specialized training in Video and sound editing.  Students will learn digital imaging for animation, use of Adobe software, digital photography, and camera usage. Students will learn advanced techniques in image capture, television production techniques and interactive media within the broadcasting industry. Students will complete electronic portfolios to highlight their work. They will also produce promotional videos for the school.CR 10 YO, 9, 10 11, 12 Prerequisite- Successful completion of previous course level.


    Creative Writing 1 (7755), 2 (7756), 3 (7757), 4 (7758) This program is a vocationally focused accelerated writing course for the serious student of writing.  Taught in a genre approach in a workshop setting, the course demands that the student set individual reading and writing goals in addition to working in assigned forms.  Cross-disciplinary projects, classroom visits by professional writers, competitions, publication opportunities, and field trips to readings and festivals are emphasized..  These classes meet for a full block both A & B days. CR 10, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Portfolio/Interview


    Theater Arts/ Drama 1 (7765), 2 (7766), 3 (7767), 4 (7768) – This is a comprehensive, career-oriented, four-year sequential program for the serious drama student.  The program covers all aspects of theatre with the focus being the refinement of the actor's skill.  Course work is augmented by guest artists, productions, and field trips. After school rehearsals may be required. Students must take the elective Stage Technology prior to senior year as part of the Drama Major. This course meets for a full block both A & B days.  CR 10, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Audition
    Visual Communication and Design: Studio Art 1 (7790), 2 (7791), 3 (7792), 4 (7793),  AP Studio Art (7794)This is a career vocationally, four-year sequential program for the serious art student interested in pursuing a career in the commercial and applied visual arts. In each level, general principles techniques, concepts and skills in computer imaging, color theory, technical drawing, painting, printmaking, still and life modeling and illustration are combined in the study of different commercial fields as it relates in the communication of ideas to businesses, consumer audiences and Fine Arts.  In levels 3 and 4, mastery of advanced art techniques and portfolio development are required. Classes emphasize art and computer drawing skills, history, aesthetics, communication skills, multimedia applications, criticism and careers in preparation for college, advanced technical school or the workplace.  Student exhibitions, interdisciplinary
    and community projects, professional guest artists, and museum/art-related field trips are part of the curriculum. These classes meet for a full block both A & B days. CR 10, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Portfolio/Interview


    VPA Music Technology: Multimedia Music


    Brass  1 (7726), 2 (7727), 3 (7728), 4 (7729) – This is a vocationally focused, four-year sequential program that prepares the serious music student for the demands required to pursue music in a Conservatory, College or University. The primary concentration of this course is the development of total musicianship for the soloist through experiential learning in technique, repertoire, performance practices, critical thinking and other aspects of musicianship. Aside from the main focus of performance of music, students will explore various genres of music history, gain live performance and studio recording experience and experiment with technology-based performance. Aspects of music production, business and music law will be addressed. Career readiness and exploration will be addressed throughout the curriculum. Various instructional technologies and internet applications will be integrated into the curriculum (such as use of spectrograms and oscilloscopes in musical training). Field trips, performances, and participation in concerts will be reflected in students’ grades.  The students in this program must also register for the appropriate levels of VPA Music History, VPA Music Theory, VPA Musicianship and RBR Band.  AP Music Theory is required in the third year of the program.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Audition


    Harp 1 (7731) – – This is a vocationally focused, four-year sequential program that prepares the serious music student for the demands required to pursue music in a Conservatory, College or University. The primary concentration of this course is the development of total musicianship for the soloist through experiential learning in technique, repertoire, performance practices, critical thinking and other aspects of musicianship. Aside from the main focus of performance of music, students will explore various genres of music history, gain live performance and studio recording experience and experiment with technology-based performance. Aspects of music production, business and music law will be addressed. Career readiness and exploration will be addressed throughout the curriculum. Various instructional technologies and internet applications will be integrated into the curriculum (such as use of spectrograms and oscilloscopes in musical training). Field trips, performances, and participation in concerts will be reflected in students’ grades.   The student in this program must also register for the appropriate levels of VPA Music History and VPA Music Theory and VPA Musicianship and Concert Choir..  AP Music Theory is required in grade 11.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Audition
    Percussion 1 (7714), 2 (7715), 3 (7716), 4 (7717) This is a vocationally focused, four-year sequential program that prepares the serious music student for the demands required to pursue music in a Conservatory, College or University. The primary concentration of this course is the development of total musicianship for the soloist through experiential learning in technique, repertoire, performance practices, critical thinking and other aspects of musicianship. Aside from the main focus of performance of music, students will explore various genres of music history, gain live performance and studio recording experience and experiment with technology-based performance. Aspects of music production, business and music law will be addressed. Career readiness and exploration will be addressed throughout the curriculum. Various instructional technologies and internet applications will be integrated into the curriculum (such as use of spectrograms and oscilloscopes in musical training). Field trips, performances, and participation in concerts will be reflected in students’ grades. The students in this program must also register for the appropriate levels of VPA Music History, VPA Music Theory, VPA Musicianship and RBR Band.  AP Music Theory is required in the third year of the program.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Audition


    Piano 1 (7780), 2 (7781), 3 (7782), 4 (7783) – This is a vocationally focused, performance-based, sequential course that prepares the serious piano student for the demands required to pursue music in a Conservatory, College or University.  The curriculum, at each level, includes form and analysis, ear training, theory, music history, sight reading, and ensemble playing.  The student is encouraged, but not required, to study privately with a piano teacher and to perform throughout the year for any of a number of programs.  Each student will be required to perform in two piano concerts as a soloist, accompanist or in ensemble.  The curriculum may also include guest artists and various field trips. The student in this program must also register for the appropriate levels of VPA Music History and VPA Music Theory and VPA Musicianship. AP Music Theory is required in grade 11, 12.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Audition


    Strings 1 (7720), 2 (7721), 3 (7722), 4 (7723) This is a vocationally focused, four-year sequential program that prepares the serious music student for the demands required to pursue music in a Conservatory, College or University. The primary concentration of this course is the development of total musicianship for the soloist through experiential learning in technique, repertoire, performance practices, critical thinking and other aspects of musicianship. Aside from the main focus of performance of music, students will explore various genres of music history, gain live performance and studio recording experience and experiment with technology-based performance. Aspects of music production, business and music law will be addressed. Career readiness and exploration will be addressed throughout the curriculum. Various instructional technologies and internet applications will be integrated into the curriculum (such as use of spectrograms and oscilloscopes in musical training). Field trips, performances, and participation in concerts will be reflected in students’ grades. The student in this program must also register for the appropriate levels of VPA Music History, VPA Music Theory, VPA Musicianship and Orchestra.  AP Music Theory is required in the third year of the program. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Audition


    Strings: Guitar 1 (7803), 2 (7814), 3,(7815), 4  (7816) - This is a vocationally focused, four-year sequential program that prepares the serious music student for the demands required to pursue music in a Conservatory, College or University. The primary concentration of this course is the development of total musicianship for the soloist through experiential learning in technique, repertoire, performance practices, critical thinking and other aspects of musicianship. Aside from the main focus of performance of music, students will explore various genres of music history, gain live performance and studio recording experience and experiment with technology-based performance. Aspects of music production, business and music law will be addressed. Career readiness and exploration will be addressed throughout the curriculum. Various instructional technologies and internet applications will be integrated into the curriculum (such as use of spectrograms and oscilloscopes in musical training). Field trips, performances, and participation in concerts will be reflected in students’ grades. The student in this program must also register for the appropriate levels of VPA Music History, VPA Music Theory and VPA Musicianship.  AP Music Theory is required in the third year of the program. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Audition


    Vocal Music 1 (7770), 2 (7771), 3 (7772), 4 (7773) –This is a vocationally focused, four-year sequential program that prepares the serious music student for the demands required to pursue music in a Conservatory, College or University. The primary concentration of this course is the development of total musicianship for the soloist through experiential learning in technique, repertoire, performance practices, critical thinking and other aspects of musicianship. Aside from the main focus of performance of music, students will explore various genres of music history, gain live performance and studio recording experience and experiment with technology-based performance. Aspects of music production, business and music law will be addressed. Career readiness and exploration will be addressed throughout the curriculum. Various instructional technologies and internet applications will be integrated into the curriculum (such as use of spectrograms and oscilloscopes in musical training). Field trips, performances, and participation in concerts will be reflected in students’ grades.  The student in this program must also register for the appropriate levels of VPA Music History and VPA Music Theory and
    VPA Musicianship and Concert Choir.  AP Music Theory is required in the third year of the program. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Audition


    Woodwind 1 (7710), 2 (7711), 3 (7712), 4 (7713) – This is a vocationally focused, four-year sequential program that prepares the serious music student for the demands required to pursue music in a Conservatory, College or University. The primary concentration of this course is the development of total musicianship for the soloist through experiential learning in technique, repertoire, performance practices, critical thinking and other aspects of musicianship. Aside from the main focus of performance of music, students will explore various genres of music history, gain live performance and studio recording experience and experiment with technology-based performance. Aspects of music production, business and music law will be addressed. Career readiness and exploration will be addressed throughout the curriculum. Various instructional technologies and internet applications will be integrated into the curriculum (such as use of spectrograms and oscilloscopes in musical training). Field trips, performances, and participation in concerts will be reflected in students’ grades.  The students in this program must also register for the appropriate levels of VPA Music History, VPA Music Theory, VPA Musicianship and RBR Band.  AP Music Theory is required in the third year of the program.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Audition


    VPA Music Theory (7740)– This is a vocationally focused, full year course beginning a sequential program in music technology and theory for VPA music majors. Utilizing notation programs such as Finale and Sibelius, students will apply technical knowledge and skills to the composition, synthesis and performance of music. Aside from computer composition, students will hone skills needed to read and write music efficiently, as well as work with the symbolic, mathematical and analytical concepts and relationships in music’s structure. . CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Vocal, Piano, and Instrumental Majors Only


    Musicianship (7741)-  This is a vocationally focused, full year course which sequentially follows VPA Music Theory.  Musical form, scoring for film and multimedia, software and multimedia development, computer composition will be the focus. Using tutorial software, this course will enhance essential aural skills, such as ear training, sight-singing, as well as practical application of keyboard harmony. This course is required for all music majors.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, PRE VPA Music Theory; Vocal, Piano, or Instrumental Majors Only


    AP Music Theory(7778) – This is an advanced course for the student planning to continue music study in college or music school.  It will prepare students for the AP Music Theory exam, which they must take in May.  Topics covered include chord constructions, chord analysis, musical forms, ear training, and dictation It will prepare students for the AP Music Theory exam, which they must take in May.  Topics covered include chord constructions, chord analysis, musical forms, ear training, and dictation.  CR 5, YO 11, 12.Suggested PRE completed VPA Musicianship, Music Theory Elective 2, Permission of the Instructor


    Advanced Music Technology (7742)— This is a vocationally focused, full year course which sequentially follows AP Music Theory for all VPA music majors. This course prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to the recording, composition and performance of music. It covers audio-visual production, recording technology, electronic music synthesis, acoustics, 3D sound and special audio, as well as various other aspects of the production of music. Students will use ProTools as well as other sequencing and creation software to achieve these goals.. Students will use ProTools as well as other sequencing and creation software to achieve these goals. Pending approval, this course will be a concurrent enrollment course offered through Brookdale Community College where students may earn 3 college credits upon payment of a reduced tuition and successful completion of the course. CR 5, YO 12, PRE VPA Musicianship


    VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS ELECTIVES


    AP Art History (7709) – This course analyzes and discusses art from prehistoric cave painting to modern art exhibited today, emphasizing the historical context in which art is created.  We shall consider not only the artists and works they produce, but style, purpose, and patronage of art through the ages. Alongside the traditional focus upon art in the European tradition the AP curriculum; Students will also examine non-European art and its characteristics, including art from China, India, Meso-America, and Africa. The goal of this course is to achieve understanding of all these visual arts in preparation for the AP exam in May. Summer work (reading, project, paper) may be assigned by the instructor to prepare students for the course.  CR 5, YO 11,12, Suggested PRE 80 overall GPA, Summer project/paper on an Art Historical Topic assigned by instructor


    AP Music Theory (7778) – This is an advanced course for the student planning to continue music study in college or music school.  It will prepare students for the AP Music Theory exam, which they must take in May.  Topics covered include chord constructions, chord analysis, musical forms, ear training, and dictation.  CR 5, YO 11,12.Suggested PRE completed VPA Musicianship, Music Theory Elective 2, Permission of the Instructor


    Art 1 (7700) – This is an introductory art course with an emphasis on design and color concepts.  Using a variety of subject matter, students will study design and composition in painting, drawing and mixed media.  Students will also be exposed to art history, criticism and aesthetics. This course may include trips to museums, galleries and arts events in order to develop an understanding of connections with other subject areas as stated in the NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12


    Art 2 (7701) – In this course, the second year art student will experience a variety of artistic media and techniques in a wide range of subject matter.  Emphasis is placed on individual expressive skills in areas such as painting, cartooning, printmaking, and study of the human figure.  Students will continue to be exposed to art history, criticism and aesthetics.  This course may include trips to museums, galleries and arts events in order to develop an understanding of connections with other subject areas as stated in the NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, PRE Art 1


    Art 3 (7702) – This advanced art course explores, through various projects, theories and techniques: sculpture, graphics and painting.  The student is encouraged to develop an individual style.  Further exploration of art history, criticism and aesthetics is part of the curriculum.  Juniors who are interested in developing portfolios for their senior year will begin to do so in the second semester.  This course may include trips to museums, galleries and arts events in order to develop an understanding of connections with other subject areas as stated in the NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards.  CR 5, YO 11,12, PRE Art 2


    Art 4 (7703) – This art course is designed for the more advanced student who chooses to specialize in two and three-dimensional media.  Special emphasis is given to seniors who are in the process of preparing a portfolio for entrance into a college or university.  This course may include trips to museums, galleries and art events in order to develop an understanding of connections with other subject areas as stated in the NJ Core Curricular Content Standards.  CR 5, YO 12, PRE Art 3


    Beginning Strings (7724)This class is for any student who wants to learn violin, viola, cello, or double bass.  It is a beginning course focusing on technique, solo and ensemble playing.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12


    Concert Choir (7775) – This is a general choral ensemble open to all students.  No previous training is necessary.  Students sing during each class period in preparation for required concerts, assemblies, and competitions.  Basic musicianship skills and aesthetics are developed through study of various styles and periods of choral music.  This is a performance-based class and includes field trips and concerts which will be reflected in students’ grades.  Students can request and receive credit for this course each year.  Embedded in the program is an “honors option” which may reward students for meeting established criteria.  Students who complete work at this level may be eligible for honors credit and a five point honors weight on their final averages. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12


    Crafts 1 (7704) – This class introduces the students to hand building art.  The students begin to explore a variety of materials and how to manipulate them in a variety of projects.  The students will learn the importance of good craftsmanship and that crafts is the foundation of engineering and mass production.  Projects incorporate science, math, culture and more.  All projects at level 1 incorporate the elements of art and design, color theory, current events, history, fine art, reading, writing and research for idea and production development.  The students will be expected to work in groups as well as individually depending on the project.  This class is ideal not only for the experienced artist but also the student who is just beginning.  The students will complete this course with a variety of projects which are practical and functional.  CR 5, YO 9, 10,11,12


    Crafts 2 (7705) – This class is for the student who has taken Crafts 1 and has developed an appreciation for hand building art.  In level 2, the students will advance their understanding of materials explored in level 1.  Projects will be more demanding of control, focus and time.  The projects in level 2 will challenge the students to fine tune their skills, move to different materials and begin to understand how they can create product which could turn into a business – crafts as a career.  CR 5, YO 10, 11,12, PRE Crafts 1


    Digital Design (7802)- Digital Design is a combination of Digital Photography and Design in a full year class. The class will focus heavily on the digital art world and the prominent programs used in the industry -- Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator. The students will learn traditional photography -- camera settings, composition, and editing. Photoshop will be introduced only as an editing tool first, then as a conceptual tool. The students will begin to see how commercial art is the vehicle used in advertising, publishing, web, animation and more for all industries from medical to music to fashion. Semester Two will focus on InDesign and Illustrator -- two more major adobe design programs. The students will combine their photos and designs together in layout while learning about typography and concept building and the difference between publishing and the web. Media, designers and photographers will be discussed. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12

    Fine Arts Appreciation (7725) – This is a full year course designed for the student who wants to learn how the arts (music, drama, dance, literature, and the visual arts) developed throughout history is the keystone course for the Interdisciplinary Arts program.  Students will look at the events and practices of the day and see how it affected the works of composers, writers, choreographers and artists from the Early, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionistic, Modern and current periods.  The course is designed to help student‘s correlate historical knowledge and styles to their own personal repertoire. This is the keystone course for the Interdisciplinary Arts SLC and it will satisfy 2.5 credits toward the 21st Century Life and Careers requirement. CR 5, YO 10


    Introduction to Guitar (7817)- Guitar class is a semester course for both students who would like to learn how to play guitar and students who already know how to play. The class will examine both strumming and plectrum techniques in various genres of music. Alternative String instruments, such as mandolin and electric strings, will be explored. Some basic music theory will be introduced throughout this performance-based course. Class size is limited to the number of instruments available (12). CR 2.5, YO 9, 10, 11, 12


    IB Visual Arts SL (7799)- The standard level Visual Arts course is designed for students to experience visual arts on a personal level while exploring a global perspective. Even though this course does not require prior experience, students must be willing to approach art with an open mind. Success in this course is determined by how students have demonstrated the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they have gained and how they have developed their abilities to be creative and imaginative and to communicate through artistic form. Students are expected to create pieces of art to be shown in an exhibit taking place in mid-March, as well as photographing work done in the Research Workbook (RWB). All these will be reviewed and sent to the IB for scoring. CR 5, YO 11 or 12


    IB Visual Arts HL 1 (7800) – This higher level Visual Arts course is for a student who has a serious interest in art and willing to approach art with an open mind.  The purpose of this course is to allow students to explore and experiment with different visual art forms emphasizing not only a personal approach but that of other cultures.  Art is a universal form of communication that is not reserved for just a few people or limited to just a few art forms. For the same reason, the focus of this class will be to encourage students to investigate, inquire and experiment with artistic approaches used by different cultures, not only in terms of media but also in concept. CR 5, YO 11


    IB Visual Arts HL 2 (7801) – In the second year of IB Visual Arts HL students will continue their art exploration from a global and personal perspective but concentrating in the creation of art based on their own artistic calling and the influences they have taken from the research done the previous year.  Students are expected to create pieces to be shown in an exhibit taking place in mid-March, as well as photographing work done in the Research Workbook (RWB).  All these will be reviewed and sent to IB International for scoring. CR 5, YO 12, PRE IB Visual Arts 1


    Introduction to Harp (7730) - This course is for any student who would like to learn to play the harm or would like to play with other harpists. Reading notes and other aspects of music will be covered. Students will play all styles of music. Students can request and receive credit for this course each year. CR 5, YO 9, 10, 11, 12


    Introduction to Piano (7789)This course is for any student who does not read music but would like to learn to play piano. Students will learn basic piano technique, how to read music, play chords, and play music of all styles. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12


    Music Industry (7804)- is a semester course that examines the growth and development of the popular contemporary music industry. Students will study Pop/Rock history with a special focus on the commercial music industry’s influence on traditional western styles and 21st century musical tastes. This course includes an introduction to the recording industry and works with some music technology, such as ProTools. Careers in the music business will also be covered. CR 2.5, YO 9, 10, 11, 12


    Music Technology (7779)- This is an elective course that explores the use of  technology to create, understand and record music. Students will explore the basics of acoustical engineering, digital  and analogue recording and other aspects of the popular music industry, including but not limited to: MIDI/music computing, notation software, sequencers, copyright, marketing, production of recorded material and current trends within record labels. Students will use the internet and tutorial programs to better their understanding of basic musicianship. This is a hands-on course that may include field trips and require additional “lab” time outside of the regular school day. CR 5, YO 10, 11, 12


    Musical Theatre (7805)- This semester course is a performance-based class that introduces students to basic techniques necessary in auditioning for and performance in Broadway-style productions. Students will be asked to sing, act and dance as a part of this course. Theatre history, critique of performances and mock auditions are all included. The course may include guest artists and field trips.  CR 2.5, YO 9, 10, 11, 12


    Music Theory 1 (7776) – This course is for the student who would like to learn to read and write music and increase their musical knowledge and vocabulary. The curriculum covers basics of music theory, ear training, and sight singing. The material is applied to various instruments, giving students the opportunity to perform. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12


    Music Theory 2 (7777) – This course is for the student who has successfully completed Music Theory 1 to continue an advanced study of music theory through composition, counterpoint and analysis.  This course is for the student who already possesses basic music reading skills.  Each student will write, sing, or play music as well as discover mathematical relationships in music.  This is an excellent class for the student who performs or plans a career in music.  Guest artists and field trips may be included. CR 5, YO 10,11,12, PRE Music Theory 1


    Orchestra (7750) – This is a general orchestra ensemble open to all students that play violin, viola, cello, bass or harp.  It is also required by all VPA String Majors. Students study repertoire for string orchestra and full orchestra in preparation for required concerts, assemblies, and festivals.  Basic musicianship skills and aesthetics are developed through study of various styles and periods of orchestra music. This is a performance-based class and includes guest artists, master classes, field trips, concerts, and participation in after school Orchestra which will be reflected in students’ grades.  Students can request and receive credit for this course each year. Embedded in the program is an “honors option” which may reward students for meeting established criteria.  Students who complete work at this level may be eligible for honors credit and a five point honors weight on their final averages.CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE ability to play a string instrument


    Percussion Ensemble (7719) – This performing ensemble is for students with previous experience with orchestral percussion instruments. The ensemble performs at both the winter and spring band concerts. Students must be able to read music. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12 PRE ability to play a percussion instrument and read music


    Piano Elective (7784) – This course is designed to allow the student already able to read music to improve their existing piano skills or gain new skills in pop, Broadway, or classical styles.  The course is tailored to the individual needs and ability levels of each student.  Students are assigned repertoire and workbooks as well as piano technique exercises.  Students can request and receive credit for this course each year. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE demonstrates ability to read music or has taken Music Theory 1


    RBR Band (7718) – This is a general band ensemble open to all students that play a brass, woodwind, or percussion instrument.  This course is also required by all VPA Instrumental Woodwind, Brass or Percussion Majors.  Students rehearse concert repertoire to prepare for community and school events, concerts, and festivals.  Basic musicianship skills are developed through the study of various styles and periods of instrumental music.  This is a performance-based class and includes field trips and concerts which will be reflected in students’ grades. All freshmen are encouraged to participate in extracurricular RBR Marching Band.  Students can request and receive credit for this course each year. Embedded in the program is an “honors option” which may reward students for meeting established criteria.  Students who complete work at this level may be eligible for honors credit and a five point honors weight on their final averages. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE ability to play a band instrument

    Supplement (2.5 credits): Students that successfully participate in the RBR Marching Band or Color Guard will receive an extra 2.5 credits for this extra-curricular activity. The RBR Marching Band will perform at football games, community events, and marching festivals and competitions. Weekly summer rehearsals and a one week band camp (during the month of August) will be held.  REQUIRED for freshmen majors in percussion, woodwind or brass


    Songwriting  (7806)- This semester course is for students interested in learning the craft and techniques of contemporary songwriting. Lyricists, rappers, musicians, vocalists and music enthusiasts are welcome. No prior music theory or instrumental experience is necessary; however, it would be helpful. All styles and genres of music will be considered for study. Some basic music theory will be introduced throughout this course. CR 2.5, YO 9, 10, 11, 12


    Stage Technology (6655) – This is a full year course emphasizing the basics of stage design and development.  This course is required by all Drama Majors prior to their senior year. Activities will include knowledge of safety, and the use of tools and equipment necessary for set design, scenic painting and construction, and exploration of careers. Students will be taught the basics of stage lighting and the use of sound equipment.  Students will be required to construct a complete set for both the fall and spring theatre production.  After-school, nights, and weekends attendance might be mandatory during construction of sets and/or during performances.  They will also be expected to assist in various concerts throughout the school year which will also require some after-school, nights, and weekend attendance. A portion of the Stage Technology Grading System will be determined by the student’s out-of-class participation at assigned performances.  Students should have some background in performing arts or technology related instruction. CR 5, YO 10,11 PRE Prototype Design, or a Technology related course, or one year of a visual or performing arts course


    Yoga Elective (7807/7808)- These full year and semester courses teach traditional Hatha yoga class in which yoga postures are studied and performed uniting breathing, movement, warming the whole body and providing the opportunity to apply alignment to movement.  The class also includes a guided meditation.  This class will strengthen and elongate muscles, will help to develop self-awareness and will soothe the participant, bringing calmness and clarity of thought. CR 5 – FY, 2.5 - Sem, YO 11, 12

  • WORLD LANGUAGE COURSES


    Italian 1 (5540)During the first year, the student is taught to communicate orally and in writing using the fundamental patterns of the language within the constraints of the vocabulary and the language structure mastered. The student is expected to ask and answer questions and to speak briefly on a given topic using good pronunciation and correct sentence structure. The student is expected to understand simple selections about the geography and culture of Italian speaking nations. CR 5, YO 9, 10, 11, 12


    Italian 2 (5541) – In the second year, all grammar points and vocabulary from the first year are reinforced. In addition, more complex structures are added in order to prepare students for the next level. The student is presented with a view of many aspects of Italian culture through reading selections and other methods. CR 5, YO 9, 10, 11, 12  


    Honors Italian 2 (5542) --This course is designed to challenge the student in greater depth than in a regular class. In addition to being responsible for material covered in the regular Italian class, students are required to write compositions and communicate orally on a more sophisticated level. The pace will be rapid, including a wider range of vocabulary and advanced media interactions. CR 5, YO 10,11,12, Suggested PRE Italian 1 with a 90 average, minimum 90 on mid-term and final exams, and teacher recommendation.
    Italian 3 (5543)In the third year, the student is taught to communicate orally and in writing on a more complex level. Major grammar points and all verb tenses are studied in depth. Italian 3 offers a wide variety of reading and writing experiences, including short novels. This course also includes the study of classic and contemporary Italian culture and civilization. CR 5, YO, 11, 12. Suggested PRE: Italian 2 with an 80 average and a minimum of 80 on the final exam or teacher recommendation.


    Honors Italian 3 (5544)This course is designed to challenge the student in greater depth than in a regular class. In addition to being more responsible for material covered in a regular Italian class, students are required to write longer and more complex compositions and communicate orally on an increasingly sophisticated level. The pace will be more rapid and include a wider range of vocabulary and more advanced reading. CR 5, YO, 11, 12. Suggested PRE: Italian 2 Honors with a 90 average and a minimum of 85 on the final exam or teacher recommendation.


    Italian 4 (5545) The purpose of this course is to continue the sequence of language study to an advanced level. Grammatical and syntactical improvement will come about in the writing of paragraphs and compositions on selected topics. Opportunity is given for improving speaking and listening comprehension skills. Various Italian cultures are also studied. CR 5, YO 11,12, Suggested PRE Italian 3 or Honors Italian 3 with a 75 average and a minimum of 75 on the final exam or teacher recommendation.


    Honors Italian 4 (5546) – The purpose of this course continues the sequence of language study to an advanced level. Grammatical and syntactical improvement will come about in the writing of paragraphs and compositions on selected topics. Honors Italian 4 also presents a variety of novels and short stories to be read and discussed. Opportunity is given for improving speaking and listening comprehension skills. Culture and major art movements of Italy are also studied. CR 5, YO 10,11,12, Suggested PRE Honors Italian 3, with a 90 average and a minimum 85 on the final exam or teacher recommendation.

    IB Italian SL (5598): --This course is designed for students with some previous learning of Italian. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills will be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material and literary texts, all of which will relate to Italian culture. While developing mastery of language skills, intercultural awareness and understanding are a priority as well. The areas of study will include: communication and media, global issues, social relationships, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, and science and technology. In addition to taking the IB examination in May, the students will complete the IB written assignment and individual and interactive oral activities throughout the year. CR 5, PRE Italian 2, Honors Italian 2, or Italian 3


    French 1 (5551) – During the first year, the student is taught to communicate orally and in writing using the fundamental patterns of the language within the constraints of the vocabulary and the language structure mastered.  The student is expected to ask and answer questions and to speak briefly on a given topic using good pronunciation and correct sentence structure.  The student is expected to understand simple selections about the geography and culture of French speaking nations.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12


    French 2 (5552) – In the second year, all grammar points and vocabulary introduced in the first year are reinforced.  In addition, more complex structures are added in order to prepare students for the next level.  The student is presented with a view of many aspects of French culture through reading selections and other methods.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE French 1


    Honors French 2 (5555) – This course is designed to challenge the student in greater depth than in a regular class.  In addition to being responsible for material covered in the regular French class, students are required to write compositions and communicate orally on a more sophisticated level.  The pace will be rapid, including a wider range of vocabulary and advanced reading.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, Suggested PRE French 1 with a 90 average and a minimum 85 on the honors level placement exam


    French 3 (5553) – In the third year, the student is taught to communicate orally and in writing on a more complex level. Major grammar points and all verb tenses are studied in depth.  French 3 offers a wide variety of reading experiences.  Culture and major art movements of France are also studied.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, PRE French 2


    Honors French 3 (5556) – This course is designed to challenge students in greater depth than in a regular class.  In addition to being responsible for material covered in a regular French class, students are required to write longer and more completed compositions and communicate orally on an increasingly sophisticated level.  The pace will be more rapid including a wider range of vocabulary and more advanced reading.  Culture and major art movements of France are also studied.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, Suggested PRE Honors French 2 (80 average or teacher recommendation), French 2 with a 90 average and a minimum 85 on the honors level placement exam and teacher recommendation

    French 4 (5554) – The purpose of this course is to continue the sequence of language study to an advanced level.  Grammatical and syntactical improvement will come about in the writing of paragraphs and compositions on selected topics.  Opportunity is given for improving speaking and listening comprehension skills.  Various French cultures are also studied.  CR 5, YO 11,12, PRE French 4 or Honors French 4


    Honors French 4 (5557) – The purpose of this course is to continue the sequence of language study to an advanced level.  Grammatical and syntactical improvement will come about in the writing of paragraphs and compositions on selected topics.  Honors French 4 also presents a variety of novels and short stories to be read and discussed. Opportunity is given for improving speaking and listening comprehension skills.  CR 5, YO 11,12,Suggested PRE Honors French 3 (80 average or teacher recommendation), French 3 with a 90 average and a minimum 85 on the honors level placement exam and teacher recommendation


    French 5 –  Advanced French Communication and Culture (5559) – This course will enable the student to continue the sequence of language study at an advanced level. This course is designed to improve oral and written communication so students can interact successfully in authentic francophone situations. The emphasis will be on oral communication and utilitarian written communication presented and applied in thematic cultural units. Contemporary reading material will be incorporated in order to facilitate natural conversation. CR 5, YO 12, Suggested PRE French 4 or Honors French 4 (80 average or teacher recommendation).  


    AP French (5558) – Advanced Placement French is offered to students who have completed three years of high school French and who have demonstrated competency in the language.  The course will emphasize oral and written abilities in the language.  In addition, the reading material will introduce works and writers of French literature to enhance appreciation and knowledge of the French language.  The four skills of language learning will be emphasized; listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  There will be a comprehensive study of the structure of the language including a review of the three previous years, and the introduction of advanced language and structure.  There will be extensive practice in the various skills required on the Language AP test.  CR 5, YO 12, Suggested PRE Honors French 4 (85 average or higher), and teacher recommendation plus summer project required


    IB French SL (5599) – This is a 1-year course designed for seniors after completion of French 3 or Honors French 3. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. Mastery of language skills is developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material and literary texts, all of which relate to the culture of France and the Francophone countries. IB French is discussion-based, relies heavily on student interaction, and promotes intercultural awareness and understanding. The areas of study include: communication and media, global issues, social relationships, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, and science and technology. In addition to taking the IB examinations in May, the students complete the IB written assignment and individual and interactive oral activities throughout the year. CR 5, YO 12, PRE French 3 or Honors French 3


    IB French HL 1 and HL 2 (5601/5602) – This is a 1-year course designed for seniors after completion of French 3 or Honors French 3. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. Mastery of language skills is developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material and literary texts, all of which relate to the culture of France and the Francophone countries. IB French is discussion-based, relies heavily on student interaction, and promotes intercultural awareness and understanding. The areas of study include: communication and media, global issues, social relationships, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, and science and technology. In addition to taking the IB examinations in May, the students complete the IB written assignment and individual and interactive oral activities throughout the year. CR 5, YO 12, PRE French 3 or Honors French 3


    Spanish 1 (5561) – During the first year, the student is taught to communicate orally and in writing using the fundamental patterns of the language within the constraints of the vocabulary and the language structure mastered.  The student is expected to ask and answer questions and to speak briefly on a given topic using good pronunciation and correct sentence structure.  The student is expected to understand simple selections about the geography and culture of Spanish speaking nations.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12


    Spanish 1 Immersion (5560) This class is taught totally in Spanish and is designed for students that are native speakers or fluent non-native speakers. Concentration will be on grammar, reading, writing and expanding vocabulary as well as Hispanic culture, literature and geography. Upon successful completion of
    this course the student should be able to advance to Honors Spanish 2 or Spanish 3 to be determined by placement testing. CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Placement test


    Spanish 2 (5562) – In the second year, all grammar points and vocabulary introduced in the first year are reinforced.  In addition, more complex structures are added in order to prepare the student for the next level.  The student is presented with a view of many aspects of Spanish Hispanic culture through reading selections and other methods.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Spanish 1


    Honors Spanish 2 (5566) – This course is designed to challenge the student in greater depth than in a regular class.  In addition to being responsible for material covered in the regular Spanish class, students are required to write compositions and communicate orally on a more sophisticated level.  The pace will be rapid, and include a wider range of vocabulary and advanced reading.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, Suggested PRE Spanish 1 with a 90 average and a minimum 85 on the final exam


    Spanish 3 (5563) – In the third year, the student is taught to communicate orally and in writing on a more complex level.  Major grammar points and all verb tenses are studied in depth.  Spanish 3 offers a wide variety of reading experiences.  This course also includes the study of classic and contemporary Hispanic culture and civilization.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, Suggested PRE Spanish 2 with a 75 average and a minimum of 75 on the final exam or teacher recommendation


    Honors Spanish 3 (5567) – This course is designed to challenge the student in greater depth than in a regular class.  In addition to being responsible for material covered in a regular Spanish class, students are required to write longer and more complex compositions and communicate orally on an increasingly sophisticated level.  The pace will be more rapid and include a wider range of vocabulary and more advanced reading.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, Suggested PRE Honors Spanish 2, with a 90 average and a minimum 85 on the final exam or teacher recommendation


    Spanish 4 (5564) – The purpose of this course is to continue the sequence of language study to an advanced level.  Grammatical and syntactical improvement will come about in the writing of paragraphs and compositions on selected topics.  Opportunity is given for improving speaking and listening comprehension skills.  Various Hispanic cultures are also studied.  CR 5, YO 11,12, Suggested PRE Spanish 3 or Honors Spanish 3 with a 75 average and a minimum of 75 on the final exam or teacher recommendation


    Honors Spanish 4 (5568) – The purpose of this course continues the sequence of language study to an advanced level.  Grammatical and syntactical improvement will come about in the writing of paragraphs and compositions on selected topics.  Honors Spanish 4 also presents a variety of novels and short stories to be read and discussed.  Opportunity is given for improving speaking and listening comprehension skills.  Culture and major art movements of Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries are also studied.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, Suggested PRE Honors Spanish 3, with a 90 average and a minimum 85 on the final exam or teacher recommendation


    AP Spanish (5569) – Advanced Placement Spanish is offered to students who have completed three years of high school Spanish and who have demonstrated competency in the language.  The course will emphasize oral and written abilities in the language.  In addition, the reading material will introduce works and writers of Spanish literature to enhance appreciation and knowledge of the Spanish language.  The four skills of language learning will be emphasized; listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  There will be a comprehensive study of the structure of the language including a review of the three previous years, and the introduction of advanced language and structure.  There will be extensive practice in the various skills required on the Language AP test.  CR 5, YO 12, Suggested PRE Honors Spanish 4 with an 85 average and a minimum 85 on the final exam or teacher recommendation


    IB Spanish SL (5590) - This is a 1-year course designed for seniors after completion of Spanish 3 or Honors Spanish 3. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. Mastery of language skills is developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material and literary texts, all of which relate to Hispanic culture. IB Spanish is discussion-based, relies heavily on student interaction, and promotes intercultural awareness and understanding. The areas of study include: communication and media, global issues, social relationships, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, and science and technology. In addition to taking the IB examinations in May, the students complete the IB written assignment and individual and interactive oral activities throughout the year. CR 5, YO 12, PRE Spanish 3 or Honors Spanish 3


    IB Spanish HL 1 and 2 (5592/5593) - This is a 2-year course designed for juniors and seniors after completion of Spanish 3, Honors Spanish 3, or Accelerated Spanish. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. Mastery of language skills is developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material and literary texts, all of which relate to Hispanic culture. IB Spanish is discussion-based, relies heavily on student interaction, and promotes intercultural awareness and understanding. The areas of study include: communication and media, global issues, social relationships, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, and science and technology. The students also read and study two works of literature. In addition to taking the IB examinations in May of senior year, the students complete the IB written assignment and individual and interactive oral activities throughout the course. CR 5 per year, YO 11 and 12, PRE Accelerated Spanish, Spanish 3 or Honors Spanish 3


    Chinese 1 (5580)During the first year, the student is taught to communicate orally and in writing using modern standard Mandarin and Pinyin transcription. The student is expected to ask and answer questions and to speak briefly on a given topic using good pronunciation and correct sentence structure. The student is expected to understand simple selections about the geography and culture of Chinese speaking nations.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12  

    Chinese 2 (5581)In the second year, students will continue the development of language skills, listening, speaking, reading and writing in Mandarin Chinese. This course maximizes the acquisition of comprehension and speaking skills necessary for practical and effective communication through hands on activities. Students will fully explore aspects of the Chinese language, be challenged to communicate with a higher level of accuracy, and be exposed to more diversified and expansive usage of the Chinese language. The understanding and appreciation of the Chinese people and their culture form an integral part of this course.  CR 5, YO 9,10,11,12, PRE Chinese 1


    Chinese 3 (5582) – In the third year, the student is taught to communicate orally and in writing on a more complex level. Students will continue the development of language skills, listening, speaking, reading and writing in Mandarin Chinese. This course continues to maximize the acquisition of comprehension and speaking skills necessary for practical and effective communication through hands on activities. Students will fully explore aspects of the Chinese language, be challenged to communicate with an even higher level of accuracy, and be exposed to more diversified and expansive usage of the Chinese language. This course also includes the study of classic and contemporary Chinese culture, art and civilization.  CR 5, YO 10,11,12, PRE Chinese 2


    Chinese 4 (5583) – The purpose of this course is to continue the sequence of language study to an advanced level. Students will continue the development of language skills, listening, speaking, reading and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Opportunity is given to maximize the acquisition of comprehension and speaking skills necessary for practical and effective communication through hands on activities. This course continues the study of classic and contemporary Chinese culture, art and civilization.  CR 5, YO 11,12, PRE Chinese 3


    Accelerated Language 2/3 (5584/5585/5586)This course is designed for the student wishing to accelerate in language studies (Spanish, Italian and/or French). Supplementing work completed during the school year, this program requires after school, summer and online meetings from May of the current school year through August of the following school year. Students taking this course will complete the requirements of levels 2 and 3 over that time, thus moving to level 4 within 3 years. Students aspiring to take AP and/or IB languages who start at level 1 are prime candidates for this course. Please see the description for Honors level 2 and 3 for specific course description. CR 5 (+1.25 Summer 1, +1.25 Summer 2) YO 10, 11,


  • RBR ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS


    Summer Slam (9100) – This program infuses core academic courses (English, math, and social studies), along with a recreational component including arts and crafts. The students are given an opportunity to begin their summer reading requirements. Students are able to mix, mingle and befriend other students from RBR’s home sending districts before the opening day of school. CR 2.5 YO Incoming Freshmen


    ELL Summer Writing Program (9102) RBR’s English Language Learners is a program designed to reinforce writing skills. The program is divided into two groups, one for higher performing students and the other for students in need of more intensive help.  For the higher performing ELL student, this program is required in order for their participation in the Brookdale “Fast Start” program for ELL seniors. Student participants who adhere to the attendance policy receive 2.5 credits toward graduation.


    TOP Program (9103) -- TOP is a Teen Outreach Program designed to teach students life skills, healthy behaviors, and a sense of purpose.  TOP is an evidenced-based curriculum designed to increase academic performance and retention rates while reducing absenteeism and pregnancy rates. Interested students must have an open study period to participate.  Students who are admitted to the program and adhere to the attendance policy receive 1.25 credits toward graduation through option two. CR 1.25  YO 9


  • SENIOR YEAR OPTIONS


    In order for any student to be eligible for a senior option program or shared time program at Brookdale Community College, they must meet all graduation requirements to be a senior at Red Bank Regional High School, must have passed all sections of the PARCC, have a good attendance and discipline record, a cumulative grade point average of at least an 82 at the end of their junior year and interview for their selected option or plan. Students in these programs must complete an RBR Senior Option Agreement form.  


    Senior Year Student Option (1010) – We are pleased to offer several different and diverse senior year option plans to the senior class of 2017 at Red Bank Regional High School.  Senior options are opportunities for our students to work in internship positions or to participate in community service projects, without pay, for credit their senior year.  Seniors will be scheduled for 3 blocks per day at the high school and then leave school to pursue the approved option of their choice.  CR 15 YO 12


    Brookdale Community College Shared Time Program (1020) – RBR has an articulation agreement with Brookdale Community College that will allow our seniors to conclude the school day at Red Bank Regional High School at the end of their scheduled classes and then travel to Brookdale Community College to take 2 courses per semester for 6 college credits.  All fees and transportation are the responsibility of the student.  We have recommended pre-approved courses of study by Brookdale and Red Bank Regional.  CR10 per semester, 20 total with a passing grade from Brookdale Community College.  YO 12


    ELL Brookdale Community College Shared Time Program (1022) -- Seniors are eligible for the “Puente al Futuro” program, or “Bridge to the Future,” a “Fast Start” college program at Brookdale Community College.  This program offers ELL seniors the opportunity to take six college credits in their senior year of high school.  Grants fund this program, and include book costs and transportation.  Students successful in the program may then apply for a full scholarship upon graduation from Red Bank Regional and continue their college education at Brookdale Community College.

  • ELECTIVE CHOICES FOR ALL STUDENTS BY GRADE LEVEL

    *This course applies toward the 5 credit Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
    **This course applies toward the 5 credit 21st Century Life and Careers, or Career-Technical Education requirement.
    */**This course applies to either the 5 credit VPA requirement OR the 5 credit 21st Century Life and Careers, or Career-Technical Education requirement. (If course is 2.5 credits, it only fulfills half the requirement.  Another course in the same area must be selected to obtain graduation requirement.)

     

    Grade 9 Electives
    Course Credits Page
    6640 **AP Computer Science Principles 5 50
    7700 *Art 1 5 58
    7724 *Beginning Strings 5 59
    6601**Business Software Solutions 2.5 20
    6653*/**Computer Aided Design 5 (see PRE) 47
    7775 *Concert Choir 5 59
    7704  *Crafts 1 5 59
    1150 *Creative Writing 1 2.5 25
    1151 *Creative Writing 2 2.5 25
    7802*/**Digital Design 5 59
    6665**Digital Literacy 2.5 47
    6669 **Freshman Survey 5 (9th only) 29
    6690 **Intro to Computer Systems 5 50
    6680 */**Intro to Engineering Design 5 51
    7817 * Intro to Guitar 5 60
    7730 * Intro to Harp 5 61
    7789 * Intro to Piano 5 61
    7804 *Music Industry 2.5 61
    7805 *Musical Theatre 2.5 61
    7776 *Music Theory 1 5 61
    7750 *Orchestra 5 (see PRE) 61
    7719 * Percussion Ensemble 5 62
    7784 * Piano Elective 5 (see PRE) 62
    6650**Prototype Design 2.5 47
    7718 * RBR Band 5 + 2.5 (see PRE) 62
    7806 * Songwriting 2.5 62
    6602**Strategies for Success 2.5 (9th, 10th only) 22

     

     

    Grade 10 Electives

    You may take any course listed under the Grade 9 Electives in addition to the following:

    Course Credits Page

    6610 **Accounting 1 5 19
    7701  *Art 2 5 (see PRE) 58
    6676 **Child & Personal Development 5 28
    2230    Contemporary World Issues 1 2.5 45
    7705  * Crafts 2 5 (see PRE) 59
    6681 **Digital Electronics 5 (see PRE) 51
    6660 */**Digital Photography 5 47
    6624 **Entrepreneurship 2.5 21
    6625 **Ethics in Business 2.5 21
    6670 */**Fashion 1, Art and Design 5 (see (PRE) 28
    6671 **Foods 1 2.5 29
    6672 **Foods 2 2.5 29
    6641 */**Honors Computer Science 2 5 (see PRE) 49
    6683 **Honors Computer Integrated Manufacturing 5 (see PRE) 51
    6691 **Honors Networking 5 (see PRE) 50
    6682 **Honors Principles of Engineering 5 (see PRE) 51
    1154 **Public Speaking 2.5 74
    1159    Intro to Philosophy 2.5 25
    8016    Intro to Sports Entertainment & Marketing 2.5 74
    8015    Intro to Sports Medicine 2.5 74
    6652 **Invention and Innovation 5 (see PRE) 47
    2100    Leadership through the Eyes of History 2.5 46
    6631 ** Marketing 2.5 21
    7777 *Music Theory 2 5 (see PRE) 61
    7779 *Music Technology 5 61
    2232   Political Science 2.5 46
    1156   Sports and Literature 2.5 26
    6655 */**Stage Technology 5 (see PRE) 63
    6651 **Transportation Technology 5 (see PRE) 48
    6627 */**Web Design 1 2.5 (see PRE) 48
    6628 */**Web Design 2 2.5 (see PRE) 48
    6654 **Women in Engineering 5 (see PRE) 52

     

     

     

    Grade 11 Electives

    You may take any course listed under the Grade 9 or 10 Electives in addition to the following:

    Course Credits Page

    1155  * Advanced Graphic Novels 5 25
    2237    American Legal Systems/Criminal Law 2.5 45
    7709  * AP Art History 5 58
    6642 **AP Computer Science A 5 49
    6637 **AP Economics 5 (see PRE) 19
    2212    AP Human Geography 5 45
    7778  * AP Music Theory 5 57
    6623 **Applied Finance 2.5 19
    7702  * Art 3 5 (see PRE) 58
    6620 **Business Economics 5 19
    6622 **Business in the Global Economy 2.5 20
    6674 **Creative American Cuisine 2.5 (see PRE) 28
    6678  * Fashion 2 5 (see PRE) 28
    1152  * Film Studies 2.5 25
    6630 **Financial Planning, Investment & Insurance 5 21
    1157    Gender Studies Literature 5 25
    2225    Global Perspectives 2.5 45
    6611 **Honors Accounting 2 5 (see PRE) 21
    6685 **Honors Aerospace Engineering 5 (see PRE) 52
    6688 **Honors Environmental Sustainability 5 (see PRE) 52
    6692 **Honors CyberSecurity 5 (see PRE) 50
    6684** Honors Civil Engineering & Architecture 5 (see PRE) 51
    2200    Honors Philosophy 5 26
    2224/2226 IB Psychology SL/HL 1 5 45
    6673 **International Culinary Experience 2.5 (see PRE) 29
    1158    Multicultural Literature 2.5 26
    6677 **Pre-School Lab 10 (see PRE) 29
    2236    Psychology 2.5 46
    2234    Sociology 2.5 46
    8018**Sports & Hospitality Marketing Management 5 (see PRE) 37
    8017 Sports Medicine 2 5 (see PRE) 37
    7807 * Yoga Semester Elective 2.5 63
    7808* Yoga 5 63

     

     

     

     

    Grade 12 Electives

    You may take any course listed under the Grade 9, 10, or 11 Electives in addition to the following:

    Course Credits Page

    7703  *Art 4 5 (see PRE) 59
    6634 **Business Management & Managerial Operations 5 (see PRE) 20
    6675 **Commercial Foods 5 (see PRE) 28
    8050    Foundations of Exercise Science & Wellness 2.5 35
    6696 **Honors Digital Forensics 5 (see PRE) 50
    6686 **Honors Engineering Design & Development 5 (see PRE) 52
    8051    Nutrition in Exercise, Wellness & Sports 2.5 36
    2255 **Tomorrow’s Teachers 5 29
    6645 **Honors Web & Mobile Application Development 5 (see PRE) 49
    8052 **Introduction to Sports Administration 5 36